Diabetes - Type 2 Community
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This patient support community is for discussions relating to type 2 diabetes, celiac disease, depression, diabetic complications, hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia, islet cell transplantation, diabetes nutrition, parenting a diabetic child, gestational diabetes, and insulin pump therapy.

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About Insulin Injections

Insulin 

If your body no longer makes enough insulin, you’ll need 

to take it. Insulin is used for all types of diabetes. Your 

doctor can help you decide which way of taking insulin is 

best for you. 

 

Taking injections. You’ll give yourself shots using a 

needle and syringe. The syringe is a hollow tube with 

a plunger. You will put your dose of insulin into the 

tube. Some people use an insulin pen, which looks 

like a pen but has a needle for its point. 

 

Using an insulin pump. An insulin pump is a small 

machine about the size of a cell phone, worn outside 

of your body on a belt or in a pocket or pouch. The 

pump connects to a small plastic tube and a very 

small needle. The needle is inserted under the skin 

and stays in for several days. Insulin is pumped from 

the machine through the tube into your body. 

 

Using an insulin jet injector. The jet injector, which 

looks like a large pen, sends a fine spray of insulin 

through the skin with high-pressure air instead of a 

needle. 

 

Using an insulin infuser. A small tube is inserted 

just beneath the skin and remains in place for several 

days. Insulin is injected into the end of the tube 

instead of through the skin. 

 

What does insulin do? 

Insulin helps keep blood glucose levels on target by 

moving glucose from the blood into your body’s cells. 

Your cells then use glucose for energy. In people who 

don’t have diabetes, the body makes the right amount 

of insulin on its own. But when you have diabetes, you 

and your doctor must decide how much insulin you need 

throughout the day and night. 

 

What are the possible side effects of insulin? 

Possible side effects include: 

 

low blood glucose 

 

weight gain 

 

How and when should I take my insulin? 

Your plan for taking insulin will depend on your daily 

routine and your type of insulin. Some people with 

diabetes who use insulin need to take it two, three, or 

four times a day to reach their blood glucose targets. 

Others can take a single shot. Your doctor or diabetes 

educator will help you learn how and when to give 

yourself insulin. 

 

Types of Insulin 

Each type of insulin works at a different speed. For 

example, rapid-acting insulin starts to work right after 

you take it. Long-acting insulin works for many hours. 

Most people need two or more types of insulin to reach 

their blood glucose targets. 

 

 

 

 

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Start Date
Jun 12, 2009
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