Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) Community
About This Community:

WELCOME to the ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT COMMUNITY: This Patient-To-Patient Community is for discussions relating to Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) which is a hole in the part of the septum that separates the atria (the upper chambers of the heart). This hole allows oxygen-rich blood from the left atrium to flow into the right atrium instead of flowing into the left ventricle as it should. This means that oxygen-rich blood gets pumped back to the lungs, where it has just been, instead of going to the body.

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What Are Holes in the Heart?

What Are Holes in the Heart?

A hole in the heart (also called an atrial septal defect (ASD) or ventricular septal defect (VSD)) is a type of simple congenital (kon-JEN-i-tal) heart defect. This is a problem with the heart's structure that's present at birth. Congenital heart defects change the normal flow of blood through the heart.

Your heart has two sides, separated by an inner wall called the septum. With each heartbeat, the right side of the heart receives oxygen-poor blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs. The left side of the heart receives oxygen-rich blood from the lungs and pumps it to the body. The septum prevents mixing of blood between the two sides of the heart.

Some babies are born with a hole in the upper or lower septum. A hole in the septum between the heart's upper two chambers (the atria, pronounced AY-tree-uh) is an ASD. A hole in the septum between the heart's lower two chambers (the ventricles, pronounced VEN-trih-kuls) is a VSD.

A hole in the septum can allow blood to pass from the left side of the heart to the right side. This means that oxygen-rich blood can mix with oxygen-poor blood, causing the oxygen-rich blood to be pumped to the lungs a second time.

Over the past few decades, the diagnosis and treatment of ASDs and VSDs have greatly improved. As a result, a child with a simple heart defect can grow to adulthood and live a normal, active, and productive life because his or her heart defect closes on its own or has been repaired.

 

 Author/Source: National Heart, Lung & Blood Institute, Division of the National Institutes of Health [NIH]

Retrieved: December 2007

 

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Start Date
Jun 12, 2008
by jen_from_NY
Last Revision
Jun 12, 2008
by jen_from_NY