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Should I discuss my ADHD with my boss?
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Should I discuss my ADHD with my boss?

Hello. I am a 24-year-old female, and I work at an animal hospital in Ohio.  After a lot of struggle creating meaningful routings in my life, holding a steady job and with basic daily tasks and activities, I decided to get help for my symptoms. After talking with councelors and a doctor, it was concluded that I was struggling with ADHD, which I didn't consider, but it makes sense in regard to my symptoms.
Part of treatment is forming and sticking to a regular routine, and I am doing great, but I have a great deal of trouble with some of the organizational and administrative tasks at work. It takes me a long time to learn a logical, meaningful and efficient way of doing these tasks, and some of my difficulties and mistakes are starting to become obvious to my employer and co-workers.
I know that keeping this job and maintaining a regular schedule will be crucial for me, but I can't continue to make the same careless mistakes at work while I learn new skills and tecniques. I fear that I will soon be labeled "careless" as more time passes and I am unable to use my being new as an excuse.
While I am rather comfortable with my boss, I have noticed that she can be a little harsh and judgemental of others for their perceived weaknesses and issues. She is quite frank and candid about everything. So, should I explain to her that I have ADHD, or try to deal with the struggles in another way?
Any advise would be much appreciated!
Lynn
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I think it is risky to tell her.  Many have a bias against those that suffer add/adhd or they don't buy into it.  And then it brings even more of a spot light on  you.  I think it will actually put more pressure on you.  And when things go better, they'll be looking for more 'add/adhd' moments.  

find ways to not make these mistakes is your best chance of survival with the company.  

I never brought attention to myself that would make others look at me differently if it might be negative.  
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Avatar_m_tn
    I tend to agree with Specialmom - at least until you have gotten to know your boss really well.  The amount of prejudice out there is amazing.
     And frankly, unless you go the meds route - you are going to have to learn to deal with this as you are now doing.
    I am guessing that what is causing you problems is the repetition of the administrative tasks.  Doing the same thing over and over again.  Probably makes you lose focus.  Gotta break those things up.  Do them while moving or standing.  Reminds me - got a friend who looks at xrays for 3 hours each day.  Finally got a grant to get a work station where he can work standing up.  Said he saw a study where they actually installed a small tread mill at that station (his next move) and the accuracy rate went up!   Point being - that even for people without ADHD - numb repeating work does lead to mistakes.  People with ADHD are supposed to be more creative!  Find ways to make the work interesting (ya right) or work at breaking up the schedule so you don't do anything too long.
    Here is a site with ideas for organization.  The site has a ton of helpful stuff if you can find it - but it will keep you reading for a long, long time so be forewarned.  http://jeffsaddmind.com/paper-based-planning-for-the-adhder-437.htm
    Another site for adults with AD/HD is totallyadd.com.  Here is a link to there forum on The Workplace / Strategies for Work.  This site is probably easier to navigate.  http://totallyadd.com/forum/forum.php?id=80
    I think in this last site you will find lots of helpful ideas!  Best wishes - and if you do find any strategies that work for you - please post back and let us know!
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Look at it from your boss' point of view. She has assigned work to you that must be carried out and completed properly. And that is why you are paid a salary. Your personal problems are not relevant, and your telling them to your boss might be seen as making excuses, or seeking special privilege.  

You may have a cross to bear, but it is yours, not hers.
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