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CRAVING those pills....a possible answer????
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CRAVING those pills....a possible answer????

My doctor prescribed this to me to stop the cravings for narcotics and it works for alcohol too!!!!  My drug counselro was really excited when I told her about this, so I'm definately interested in it-maybe some of you can mention it to your doctors if staying clean is a challenge.....Naltrexone is the name!  Worth a try!  I'm back and forth on whether I want to get on it...I feel I'm handling at the moment, but that's just today...tomorrow could kill me! :)  ARGH!!!!!!

This is what I was talking about Opi...
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401095_tn?1351395370
That is the non-narcotic ingredient in sub...i am almost sure...it will block the effect of opiates...if you take em u wont feel em...did not know it stopped cravings tho...let us know how it works out...we give it in the hospital with overdoses to reverse the effects of narcotics
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Avatar_f_tn
Well, isn't sub a ***** to get off of? If it is similiar I am not interested personally, so I am just curious.
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Avatar_f_tn
I'd be surprised if it was, they didn't say anything like that to me....I haven't taken any yet....but I'm glad you brought that up...
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Avatar_f_tn
In wikipedia, it says not to be confused with naloxone-which reverses the od's..
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Avatar_f_tn
No, they are two different things, just looked it up....
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382273_tn?1206533085
Now don't quote me on this but I do believe that naltrexone is the other ingredient in Suboxone and that is what makes wds from suboxone alot harder than as if you were withdrawing from subutex which is a sister drug of suboxone but minus the naltrexone. If any of that makes any sense to ya. But anyhow I would do alot more research on it prior to jumping into taking it. Obviously doctors don't mind giving out scripts for stuff or none of us would be here. Catch my drift??? Goodluck in your search for help with relapse prevention. Wish I could be of more assistence for you in that area but I seem to have a problem with that myself. Goodluck
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401095_tn?1351395370
The usefulness of naltrexone in opioid dependence is very limited by the low retention in treatment. Like disulfiram in alcohol dependence, it temporarily blocks substance intake and does not affect craving. Though sustained-release preparations of naltrexone has shown rather promising results, it remains a treatment only for a small part of the opioid dependent population, usually the ones with an unusually stable social situation and motivation (e.g. dependent health care professionals).

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Avatar_f_tn
Thanks for the info. I was wanting to make sure......I guess I probably just will not ever look at any meds the same and want all info. about it. Maybe that is a good thing...LOL
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401095_tn?1351395370
Naltrexone, a derivative of naloxone is an orally active and long acting potent pure narcotic antagonist. Clinical pharmacology studies demonstrated that oral naltrexone at 50, 100 and 150mg effectively blocks the physiological and subjective effects of parenterally administered heroin, hydromorphone or morphine for 24, 48 and 72 hours respectively. Naltrexone is rapidly biotransformed into a less active metabolite. No change was observed in the rate of naltrexone disposition during chronic dosing indicating no metabolic induction. Studies showed the lowest effective plasma naltrexone concentration of 2ng/ml provided an average of 86.5% blockade of 25mg IV heroin effects. Thus, in sustain released therapy for opiate antagonist activity, plasma level of naltrexone should be kept above 2ng/ml. (Veraby, 74)

Initial development of naltrexone as a medication to be marketed for the treatment of heroin addiction was initiated by the Special Action Office for Drug Abuse Prevention (SAODAP) in the early 1980s and completed by NIDA including preclinical toxicology, pharmacokinetics and clinical studies. No organ toxicity, developmental toxicity or carcinogenicity were revealed in the preclinical studies. Naltrexone was approved by the FDA in 1984 on the basis of its pharmacological efficacy as a narcotic antagonist and its safety profile. Although clinical efficacy data in the multi-site placebo controlled clinical trial were inconclusive, naltrexone was superior to placebo in producing less heroin use and more abstinence in those who tested the naltrexone blockade by using heroin at least once. In 1995, Naltrexone was approved by the FDA for the new indication of preventing relapse to alcohol use in formerly dependent alcoholic patients (Vocci).

Naltrexone has been used together with clonidine to shorten detoxification from heroin or methadone from two weeks to only one day. Withdrawal from the opiate is precipitated by naltrexone and resulting symptoms amerolirated by clonidine. The cost saving for this approach are substantial compared to use of methadone tapering (Kosten). More recently, the use of general anesthesia or heavy sedation with medazolam along with naltrexone has further shortened the detoxification to 4-6 hours. This procedure is sought by patients for reasons such as fear of withdrawal discomfort; need to shorten the hospital stay, etc (Kleber).



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Barriers for Wider Use of Naltrexone

Naltrexone has very few and minor side effects. It is the treatment of choice in highly motivated patients, especially physicians, nurses, pharmacists and attorneys (O'Brien). However, clinical experience using naltrexone for treating opiate addiction has been replete with data on the poor medication compliance. Ling reported a 6% retention for 60 days and 2% retention for 9 months in 276 methadone maintained patients who expressed some interest in trying naltrexone treatment. Another study with 252 street heroin addicted patients treated with naltrexone had only 5% retention for 60 days and no retention for 9 months. The main reason given for this poor treatment retention and low patient compliance is that naltrexone's lack of agonist activity does not provide any drug reinforcement when taken and produces no negative consequences (withdrawal symptoms) when discontinued.

Others have suggested that patients are reluctant to take naltrexone because of fear of drug related dysphoria or depression. It has been hypothesized that naltrexone may block the effects of endogenous opiate peptides and prevent normal endogenous opioid receptor activity involved in mood modulation producing a subjective state of dysphoria. Animal laboratory data suggest opioid system up regulation associated with chronic naltrexone administration. However, a review of clinical studies using naltrexone treatment for opiate and alcohol dependence showed very limited occurance of naltrexone-related dysphoria and depression. (Miotto,1997)

Some physicians report a reluctance to prescribe naltrexone due to the "black box" warning of liver toxicity in the package insert. The warning was included based on liver enzyme elevations reported with 100-300mg/day doses of naltrexone during studies of naltrexone treatment for obesity. A review of literature and adverse effect reports from the manufacture demonstrated the safety of using 50 mg/day for alcohol or opiate dependent patients (Galloway).

The lack of wider use of naltrexone by physicians may also be partly due to the lack of market promotion by the manufacturer resulting in poor understanding of how and when to use naltrexone. Treatment providers have not been fully informed about naltrexone's unique role in facilitating relapse-prevention in opioid addicted patients. An experienced clinician who has considerable success in naltrexone treatment of heroin addicts suggested that naltrexone should be viewed as an adjunct to a wide range of individualized psychobehavioral treatments which may also include the use of other psychotropic medications for comorbid mental disorders. Patients families or friends should be encouraged to participate in treatment planning and compliance monitoring (Resinick).



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Avatar_f_tn
Awesome, thanks, where did you find this?
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Avatar_f_tn
I saw that show too.  It's used for alcohol at this time.  Don't know how effective it is with opiates, although, it works on the same receptors........
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390416_tn?1275188687
Not familiar w/ it...research it before you use it!!!

Good to hear you're doing well with the drug counselor!!!
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Avatar_f_tn
Every site says something differnt about it.....whether it's side effects, or it's interections with other meds....argh!  kinda frustrating!  
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401095_tn?1351395370
I dont think it is addictive or anything like that...just does not help cravings...will just keep you from taking narcs as you wont feel them....but it is short acting so u could let it wear off and take them i think...doesnt sound like a very good choice to stop cravings as it has no mental effect at all
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269143_tn?1310798952
i'm feeling pretty good....i am trying my best to avoid ingesting somehting else....my mental state is all messed up though,,,,i seem to only crave when i'm have mental anguish(24 hrs a day lately)..i did see my doc again today and he just smiles at me and says i'm doing good..?...yeah but i don't sleep doc and i'm stressed  right the .... out...big smile....and says with his mid eastern accent,,,you're doing good....he then complains about how many doctors over prescibes  oxycontin and how messed up patiants get and it is a bad drug(i'm layin on the floor doin the chicken yellin NO ****!)...then the appointment was over i'm walkin home scratching out of cofusion (not an oxy itch) wodering why i was there in the first place...then walked home on snombile tracks so the cops don't catch me  cuz my transmission blew ........i'm ok though,,,i was very bitter from 8 am to 5 pm then things settled....i have writen the name down just in case
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401095_tn?1351395370
What is naltrexone (“Revia”) and how it is used?
Naltrexone produces no influence on the state of health and does not result in addiction. Naltrexone blocks the effects of all opioids (heroin, morphine, tramadol, etc.). It is recognised all over the world for the treatment of opioid addiction. Naltrexone acts on opioid receptors, i.e., spinal and brain areas sensitive to narcotic substances. It displaces narcotic substances and binding to the receptors protects from the effect of narcotic substances.

Usually, naltrexone is given orally. During intensive detoxification procedure the body is saturated with naltrexone. Later on, naltrexone should be taken daily for at least twelve months. In recent years, the efforts have been made to develop and introduce the extended-release naltrexone products. Some of them are implanted subcutaneously, some are injected with the help of a special needle. The latter techniques are not finally approved or are still under studies. In rare cases they may be applied in the individual manner, if other techniques are non-effective.

Naltrexone must be taken at the presence of a close person. Sometimes we recommend especially strict conditions, e.g., we offer to crush the drug, dissolve in water and drink with a glass of liquid. Daily use of naltrexone helps to take personal responsibility for the own life, protects from unpredictable temptations and relapses. By itself, naltrexone is not sufficient for getting cured, however its therapy is a must for maintaining sobriety.

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What happens when narcotic substances are used in the background of naltrexone therapy?
Naltrexone protects from feeling “high” under the effect of opioids. Opioids used in first postdetoxification days may cause spastic headaches, nausea, vomiting and diarrhoea. Naltrexone therapy helps to gradually regain the usual sensitivity of nervous system to all substances having effect on mental system. We urgently ask you not to test the activity of naltrexone with any of narcotic substances.

Naltrexone 50 mg daily is a sufficient dose to block the effect of opioids and prevent relapse. Any patient abstaining from opioids for a longer period of time becomes more sensitive, i.e. after relapse, the former usual dose may cause severe, even fatal poisoning.

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Is the use of naltrexone sufficient?
Successful treatment depends not only on the therapy but on the proper care as well. There are other preconditions of successful treatment.

Self-motivation – desire to get rid of the dependence.

Close person able to take care of the maintenance treatment with naltrexone all year round without any breaks.

Family or other doctor who will monitor the maintenance treatment with naltrexone. Professional consultations and their attendance during the postdetoxification period.

  
  
      


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Avatar_f_tn
Yeah, I read this one...I'm googling the he(( outa it.,  I'll call my counselor in the morning and get the skinny.  I trust her. See above it says it protects against unpredictable temptation and relapse AND the feeling of "high" if you take the narc....

Opi, you are doing very well!!!!  Just keep it up!  You've got a good head on your shoulders-even though you're a class clown.



THe real reason  i'm really interested is for my brother in law to try and help him off of methadone.....I can handle my temptations, no doctors are going to give me pills, and I'm not buying them off the streets, so I think I can make it, but if it can help him suffer less getting off the methadone, I'll try to help him.  We're going to go to meetings starting Friday or SUnday-if he doesn't flake....we'll see.  Thanks worried, appreciate it....I've got so many open tabs in my browser it's insane!!!  G'nite.
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390416_tn?1275188687
Flutter...that's cool..you talked him into going to some meetigns with  you???
GOOD JOB!!!
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Avatar_f_tn
It wasn't hard, poor kid was on Oxy's for 4 years, then got on the methodone and the clinic LOVED him, have kept him there for a year and kept increasing the doses-imagine that!  My husband's sister has had it, with the money and the way his life revolves around a "fix" for the past five years.  He's got horrible influences all around him, his family all carpools to the clinic.  And gets pills, sells them, whatever.  Kid needs support, and I think since I've been there now, he can trust me.  Hey, it'll help me get my buns to a meeting too.  They're not all in the best neighborhoods, you know,?- so having a guy to go with will put my husband's mind at ease too.  It wasn't hard talking him into it....getting him to actually GO, we'll see......
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Avatar_f_tn
In hardcore situations, it it given by injection so you can't mess up.  I don't think it is being used as widely with opiate addiction because of how effectively it works.  The pharama's probably have something to do with that.  Sad, but probably true.  I saw something recently on the boob tube about it....and it was insinuated that that may be the case.  
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