Addiction: Substance Abuse Community
everyone naloxone
About This Community:

This community is a place to share information and support with others who are trying to stop using drugs, prescription drugs, alcohol, tobacco or other addictive substances. Discuss with others, the symptoms of addiction, addiction recovery, ways to quit like tapering and cold turkey, and withdrawal symptoms. If you are interested in general "chat", please visit our Addiction Social Community.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

everyone naloxone

I was thinking the sub was the same as naloxone. Plz tell me the difference. Will the naloxone help with withdrawals also?? Ruthie
Related Discussions
18 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
228686_tn?1211558307
Suboxone is an opiate derivative that's supposed to block other opiates, but I can't comment on if that's true.

Naloxone, I THINK, is a changed form of naltrexone. It's supposed to cause instant withdrawals if you try to inject suboxone (I.V. usage).  It doesn't do anything to help you, it's simply a government/medical control of your body and what you put in it.

Somebody chime in if I'm mixing up my meds, but I don't think so..
Blank
268662_tn?1203174838
Naloxone: A drug that antagonizes morphine and other opiates. Naloxone is a pure opiate antagonist and prevents or reverses the effects of opioids including respiratory depression, sedation and hypotension. Sold under the brand name of Narcan and in combination with buprenorphine as Suboxone.
i got this straight off  MedicineNet.com

Buprenorphine: A prescription medication for people addicted to heroin or other opiates that acts by relieving the symptoms of opiate withdrawal such as agitation, nausea and insomnia. Buprenorphine is more weakly addictive and has a lower risk of overdose than methadone. The effects last for about three days.

Buprenorphine is sold under the brand name of Subutex and, in combination with naloxone, as Suboxone. Subutex is intended for use at the beginning of treatment while Suboxone is intended for the maintenance treatment of opiate addiction. (Naloxone was added to guard against intravenous abuse of buprenorphine by individuals physically dependent on opiates.)

The side effects of buprenorphine include cold or flu-like symptoms, headaches, sweating, sleeping difficulties, nausea, and mood swings. Buprenorphine can cause dangerously diminished breathing, especially when used in combination with alcohol or other central nervous system depressants.

Blank
268662_tn?1203174838
hope that helps
Blank
228686_tn?1211558307
Now...are you sure you don't mean naltrexone? Because that does do that. But my understanding from the buphenorphine board was that nalexone was a derivative of it, that works only in regard to the buphenorphine. I'm not saying I'm right, I'm just saying what they told me. I was sceptical, a doctor confirmed it...still sceptical.
Blank
268662_tn?1203174838
i copied and pasted this straight from  MedicineNet.com because i wasnt sure myself i only typed one sentence in that whole 2 paragraphs check out MedicineNet.com may be i got the wrong definition if so im sorry just trying to help
Blank
268662_tn?1203174838
let me know what you find
Blank
224049_tn?1204594715
Well thanks everyone. Ithink Iget it,I will looki nto it a little more Ruthie
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Here's what I copied from the net on the drug b/c Im thinking about getting it.

Answers to Frequently Asked Questions About Naltrexone Treatment for Alcoholism *
1. What is naltrexone?

Naltrexone is a medication that blocks the effects of drugs known as opioids (a class that includes morphine, heroin or codeine). It competes with these drugs for opioid receptors in the brain. It was originally used to treat dependence on opioid drugs but has recently been approved by the FDA as treatment for alcoholism. In clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of naltrexone, patients who received naltrexone were twice as successful in remaining abstinent and in avoiding relapse as patients who received placebo-an inactive pill.

2. Why does naltrexone help for alcoholism?

While the precise mechanism of action for naltrexone's effect is unknown, reports from successfully treated patients suggest three kinds of effects. First, naltrexone can reduce craving, which is the urge or desire to drink. Second, naltrexone helps patients remain abstinent. Third, naltrexone can interfere with the tendency to want to drink more if a recovering patient slips and has a drink.

3. Does this mean that naltrexone will "sober me up" if I drink?

No, naltrexone does not reduce the effects of alcohol that impair coordination and judgement.

4. If I take naltrexone, does it mean that I don't need other treatment for alcoholism?

No, naltrexone is only one component of a program of treatment for alcoholism including counseling, help with associated psychological and social problems and participation in self-help groups. In both studies where naltrexone was shown to be effective, it was combined with treatment from professional psychotherapists.

5. How long does naltrexone take to work?

Naltrexone's effects on blocking opioids occurs shortly after taking the first dose. Findings to date suggest that the effects of naltrexone in helping patients remain abstinent and avoid relapse to alcohol use also occur early.

6. Are there some people who should not take naltrexone?

Naltrexone should not be used with pregnant women, individuals with severe liver or kidney damage or with patients who cannot achieve abstinence for at least 5 days prior to initiating medications. Also, people who are dependent on opioid drugs, like heroin or morphine must stop their drug use at least 7 days prior to starting naltrexone.

7. What does it feel like to be on naltrexone?

Aside from side effects, which are usually short-lived and mild, patients usually report that they are largely unaware of being on medications. Naltrexone usually has no psychological effects and patients don't feel either "high" or "down" while they are on naltrexone. It is not addicting. While it does seem to reduce alcohol craving, it does not interfere with the experience of other types of pleasure.

8. What are the side effects of naltrexone?

In the largest study, the most common side effect of naltrexone affected only a small minority of people and included the following: nausea (10%), headache (7%), dizziness (4%), fatigue (4%), insomnia (3%), anxiety (2%), and sleepiness (2%). These side effects were usually mild and of short duration. As treatment for alcoholism, naltrexone side effects, predominantly nausea, have been se vere enough to discontinue the medication in 5-10% of the patients starting it. For most other patients side effects are mild or of brief duration. One serious possibility is that naltrexone can have toxic effects on the liver. Blood tests of liver function are performed prior to the onset of treatment and periodically during treatment to determine whether naltrexone should be started and whether it should be discontinued if the relatively rare side effect of liver toxicity is taking place.

9. Do I need to get blood tests while I'm on naltrexone? How often?

To ensure that naltrexone treatment is safe, blood tests should be obtained prior to initial treatment. Following that, retesting generally occurs at monthly intervals for the first three months, with less frequent testing after that point. More frequent testing may be requested depending on the health of your liver prior to beginning treatment. Blood tests are needed to make sure that liver function is adequate prior to taking naltrexone and to evaluate whether naltrexone is having adverse effects on the liver.

10. Can I take other medications with naltrexone?

The major active effect of naltrexone is on opioid drugs, which is one class of drugs used primarily to treat pain but is also found in some prescription cough preparations. Naltrexone will block the effect of normal doses of this type of drug. There are many non-narcotic pain relievers that can be used effectively while you are on naltrexone. Otherwise, naltrexone is likely to have little impact on other medications patients commonly use such as antibiotics, non-opioid analgesics (e.g., aspirin, acetaminophen, ibuprofen), and allergy medications. You should inform your physician of whatever medication you are currently taking so that possible interactions can be evaluated. Because naltrexone is broken down by the liver, other medications that can affect liver function may affect the dose of naltrexone.

11. Will I get sick If I drink while on naltrexone?

No. Naltrexone may reduce the feeling of intoxication and the desire to drink more, but it will not cause a severe physical response to drinking.

12. Will I get sick If I stop naltrexone suddenly?

Naltrexone does not cause physical dependence and it can be stopped at any time without withdrawal symptoms. In addition, available findings regarding cessation do not show a "rebound" effect to resume alcohol use when naltrexone is discontinued.

13. What should I do If I need an operation or pain medication?

You should carry a card explaining that you are on naltrexone and that also instructs physicians on pain management. Many pain medications that are not opioids are available for use. If you are going to have elective surgery, naltrexone should be discontinued at least 72 hours beforehand.

14. What Is the relationship of naltrexone to AA?

There is no contradiction between participation in AA and taking naltrexone. Naltrexone is not addictive and does not produce any "high" or pleasant effects. It can contribute to achievement of an abstinence goal by reducing the craving or compulsion to drink, particularly during early phases of recovery. It is most likely to be effective when the patient's goal is to stop drinking altogether.

15. How long should I stay on naltrexone?

If naltrexone is tolerated and the patient is successful in reducing or stopping drinking, the recommended initial course of treatment is 3 months. At that time the patient and clinical staff should evaluate the need for further treatment on the basis of degree of improvement, degree of continued concerns about relapse and level of improvement in areas of functioning other than alcohol use.

Blank
228686_tn?1211558307
I checked with the suboxone board, and they confirmed that nalexone is specifically used with suboxone to keep suboxone users from misusing it. They're claiming it only affects suboxone; in other words, try to inject suboxone, it will not work. (I believe it will then cause instant withdrawal).
It's not to be confused with naltrexone.

I don't quite see how that works, but there you go...
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
oh duh. I put up info for a diff drug name.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
where is the suboxone board?
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
I just started taking suboxone 5 days ago, it works great for the W/Ds, I am sleeping, no chills, or pains. The only problem is I am major puking and nausious. I called my dr. today to get on some phenergan. Anyone have any other advice? Can you get addicted t phenergan? Never taken it before.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Ive taken phenergan plenty of times and no its not physically addictive.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
itll also help you sleep. Theres also something called zolfran (sp?) for nausea that doesnt make you sleepy. But look on the bright side, all the puking is getting all that c r a p outta yer system!
Blank
228686_tn?1211558307
www (dot) naabt (dot) org/

It's a buphenorphine peer support forum. Deals exclusively with getting on and off suboxone. I feel kind of stupid for not suggesting it to some of you on suboxone before now. But they've got lots of folks there on that treatment, and deal with side effects and the like as well.
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
is it ok to take naltrexone if you have hep c.....just found out in the fall not on med yet for the hep c
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Macygirl. Yes you can take it if you have hep c. Don't know about if taking medicine for it. Interferon treatment can be nasty or not but your Doctor can tell you better. My husband has hep c but it is not affecting him so he has not treated it yet. Maybe someday but he has to be clean first.

Be careful of starting suboxone though. Many here have done it and are now getting off it. Just get off what you are taking instead. It will be easier.
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
Sigh. So much misinformation. From Wikipedia:

Alcohol dependence

The main use of naltrexone is for the treatment of alcohol dependence. Naltrexone was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of alcohol dependence in 1994, following publication of the first two randomized, controlled trials in 1992. Since then a number of studies have confirmed its efficacy in reducing frequency and severity of relapse to drinking.[1] The multi-center COMBINE study showed the usefulness of naltrexone in a primary care setting, without adjunct psychotherapy.[2]

Opioid dependence

Naltrexone helps patients overcome opioid addiction by blocking the drugs’ euphoric effects. Unlike when used for alcohol dependence (discussed above), naltrexone has little effect on opioid cravings.[7] Naltrexone has in general been better studied for alcohol dependence than in treating opioid dependence. It is also more frequently used for alcohol, despite originally being approved by the FDA in 1984 for opioid addiction.[8]

A 2011 review of studies suggests that more research is needed to show naltrexone's effectiveness in treating opioid dependence (and to compare naltrexone to other options such as methadone and buprenorphine).[9] While some patients do well with the oral formulation, there is a drawback in that it must be taken daily, and a patient whose cravings become overwhelming can obtain opioid intoxication simply by skipping a dose before resuming opioid use. Due to this issue, the usefulness of oral naltrexone in opioid dependence is limited by the low retention in treatment. Oral naltrexone remains an ideal treatment only for a small part of the opioid-dependent population, usually the ones with an unusually stable social situation and motivation (e.g., opioid-dependent health care professionals). Naltrexone treats the physical dependence on opioids, but further psychosocial interventions (such as counselling and group therapy) are often required to enable people to maintain abstinence.[10]

This is all sourced. Folks, please do your homework.

And Savas, clinical studies have shown that adding naloxone to buprenorphine does nothing to deter IV usage. In fact, it causes more harm than good so . . .

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2791788/

1. Chai LY, Khare CB, Chua A, Fisher DA, Tambyah PA. Buprenorphine diversion: a possible reason for increased incidence of infective endocarditis among injection drug users? The Singapore experience. Clin Infect Dis. Mar 15 2008;46(6):953-5; author reply 955-6. [Medline].
2. Bruce RD, Govindasamy S, Sylla L, Kamarulzaman A, Altice FL. Lack of reduction in buprenorphine injection after introduction of co-formulated buprenorphine/naloxone to the Malaysian market. Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 2009;35(2):68-72. [Medline]. [Full Text].
3. Chong E, Poh KK, Shen L, Yeh IB, Chai P. Infective endocarditis secondary to intravenous Subutex abuse.Singapore Med J. Jan 2009;50(1):34-42. [Medline].

Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Addiction: Substance Abuse Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Addiction Answerers
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
gnarly_1
phoenix, AZ
4810126_tn?1415169246
Blank
EvolverU
Boston, MA
3197167_tn?1348972206
Blank
clean_in_ks
KS
4522800_tn?1405696702
Blank
VICourageous
ID
6942344_tn?1417222347
Blank
Amandag78
Perth, Australia
1235186_tn?1339127464
Blank
atthebeach
on the beach, NJ