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Celiac Disease
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Celiac Disease

If my mom changes to a full blown gluten free diet is that a cure. Will she get better over time?Or is that only going to stop the disease in its track? In other words, is the damage already done?
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519035_tn?1348279373
No I don't believe so It takes time with any changes to your body. It should get better. Is she seeing a nutrtionist? She might want to look into one.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,
Celiac disease is a digestive disease that damages the small intestine and interferes with absorption of nutrients from food. People who have celiac disease cannot tolerate a protein called gluten, found in wheat, rye, and barley. Gluten is found mainly in foods but may also be found in products we use every day, such as stamp and envelope adhesive, medicines, and vitamins.
When people with celiac disease eat foods or use products containing gluten, their immune system responds by damaging the small intestine. The tiny, fingerlike protrusions lining the small intestine are damaged or destroyed. Called villi, they normally allow nutrients from food to be absorbed into the bloodstream. Without healthy villi, a person becomes malnourished, regardless of the quantity of food eaten.
The only treatment for celiac disease is to follow a gluten-free diet. For most people, following this diet will stop symptoms, heal existing intestinal damage, and prevent further damage. Improvements begin within days of starting the diet. The small intestine is usually completely healed in 3 to 6 months in children and younger adults and within 2 years for older adults. Healed means a person now has villi that can absorb nutrients from food into the bloodstream.
In order to stay well, people with celiac disease must avoid gluten for the rest of their lives. Eating any gluten, no matter how small an amount, can damage the small intestine. The damage will occur in anyone with the disease, including people without noticeable symptoms.
ref:http://digestive.niddk.nih.gov/ddiseases/pubs/celiac/
Hope this information answers your questions.




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404138_tn?1308945256
Thanks for the responses. You did answer my question, im relieved to know that with time she can heal from this. Thanks so much.
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