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allergic to cortisone?
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allergic to cortisone?

I have a herniated disk, and Dr. wanted to give my cortisone shots. I remember my mother telling me I was allergic to it. I told Dr. that, but was forced to take it because I am on workmans comp. Following shot, I began a menstral cycle that lasted 3 months nonstop. Ideveloped acne and facial hair. I had joint pain and lost weight. The doctor didnt believe me and tried to get me to take another shot. I refused and my workers comp benefits were stopped. One year larer, I was forced to take shot again. Exact same symptoms happened, except I lost 20 pounds. It is 1 year later and I cant gain weight and my liver panels are elevated. I still have acne and facial hair. Could someone please tell me what to do, as I am at my whits end!!!
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Avatar_f_tn

Have your physicians' checked your hormone and cortisol levels yet ?
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Avatar_n_tn
My Dr. requested adenoid study, but workers comp refused
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Avatar_f_tn

Checking your hormone levels is something else. All is requires is a blood test. I would talk to you physician about it and find out what he/she says.

Good luck !
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584086_tn?1221406754
In the mid-1970s, I was given an injection of cortisone as a "precautionary measure" following a slight wasp sting on a hot summer day. I had never had a bad reaction to either wasp or bee stings, and I was not having one at that time aside from a small welt around the sting site; so I declined the injection. However, my employer insisted that I go to the doctor whose office was next door (Dr. Adams) and get an injection "just to be on the safe side." The injection nearly killed me!

The Dr. Adams injected me with cortisone, which was commonly used to counteract the reaction to a bee or wasp sting. In my case, it almost resulted in my death. Luckily, my regular doctor, Dr. Collins, was notified and rescued me before Dr. Adams could finish his murderous plot!

Within five minutes after receiving the cortisone injection, egg-size knots appeared all over my arms, chest, and back; my chest began constricting, and it became hard to breathe; and my heart felt like it was trying to pound its way out of my chest. I then began to experience mental confusion and disorientation. By the time I was taken to the emergency room at the hospital, I was fighting for breath and wheezing as if I had asthma, and my face began to swell. My heart was beating so hard, I thought it would burst.

Dr. Adams, who gave me the injection, was notified and came to the ER. As soon as he saw me, he insisted on giving me another injection of cortisone, saying that I was severely allergic to the wasp sting.

I refused the injection, telling him that it was the cortisone that had caused the reaction and not the sting. He told a nurse to hold me down while he gave me the injection. I knocked the syringe from the doctor's hand and threatened the nurse with bodily harm if she tried to restrain me. I then told the charge nurse to call my doctor, Dr. Collins, which she did. Collins was already at the hospital and was there almost immediately--or so it seemed. Meanwhile, I was becoming more confused and disoriented and feared that Adams and the nurse would take advantage of the situation before Dr. Collins could arrive.

Upon Dr. Collins' arrival, Dr. Adams told him that I was severely allergic to wasp stings and that he was trying to give me a second cortisone injection. I told Collins what happened, and he told Dr. Adams that I did the right thing refusing the second injection. He told Dr. Adams that a second injection would have killed me and that he had no right to give any patient any medical treatment against the patient's will. Collins then took over my treatment and ordered two injections to counteract the cortisone.

I am not sure what one of the injections was, but I know that one of them was an antihistamine to counteract the swelling. By then, my throat had begun swelling and was closing off my airway. I could still breathe, but between the swollen trachea and constriction in my chest (it felt like someone's arms around my chest, trying to squeeze the air out of my lungs), breathing was difficult. Also, my face had swollen so much that my eyes were almost swollen shut. My heart continued to pound like a sledge hammer.

Even with the countermeasures, it took several hours for the swelling in my face and throat to go away. The tightness in my chest and pounding of my heart subsided within a few minutes of receiving the antihistamine and whatever else Dr. Collins had given me.

I was kept in the hospital overnight and was closely monitored by the nurses. Dr. Collins came by every couple of hours to check on me. His biggest concern, once my heartbeat and the tracheal swelling.

When the swelling finally went away after 12-14 hours and my mind was clear again, I was released from the hospital.

At the time of my release, Dr. Collins told me that I was never to have another cortisone injection. He also told me to never have a tetanus shot under any circumstances, because it would probably trigger the same response that the cortisone injection had. He said that another injection of cortisone would probably trigger an even more severe reaction and could possibly kill me.

Since then I have avoided tetanus shots and anything that contains cortisone.

One side effect of the cortisone injection was damage to a valve in my heart that was minor but which showed up a couple of years later in the form of arrhythmia, for which I was prescribed quinadine; but the side effects of quinadine are so severe and permanent (renal failure) that I now control the arrhythmia with diet (electrolytes daily). After the cortisone injection--or the reaction to it--I was suddenly allergic to aspirin, which had never occurred before. I am also severely allergic to ibuprophen and naproxin. I'm no doctor, so I don't know what the connection is between cortisone, aspirin, ibuprophen, and naproxin. The reaction to the cortisone, though, is what brought on the allergies to the other drugs. That was 33 years ago, and I still have to beware of cortisone.
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584086_tn?1221406754
Sorry for the confusion.
Paragraph 9 in my comment should have read as follows:

I was kept in the hospital overnight and was closely monitored by the nurses. Dr. Collins came by every couple of hours to check on me. His biggest concern was my heartbeat and the tracheal swelling.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi

Cortisone is a steroidal hormone produced by the adrenal glands. Cortisone is used in the treatment of various inflammatory disorders, allergies, skin conditions, ulcerative colitis, arthritis, lupus, psoriasis and breathing disorders. Many inflammatory orthopedic conditions are also amenable to cortisone shots. These include, but are certainly not limited to shoulder bursitis, arthritis, tennis elbow, etc.

Cortisone is a normal body product therefore, there are no true allergic reactions However, it is possible to be allergic to other aspects of the injection, most commonly the betadine used to sterilize the skin. These days semi-synthetic cortisone derivatives are used as they have greater efficacy and fewer side effects.

Cortisone and its derivatives are steroids, among the most potent anti-inflammatory drugs known. Steroids whenever administered orally, they are given at the lowest effective dose and are never stopped suddenly.

The most common side effect with cortisone injection is a 'cortisone flare,' a condition where the injected cortisone crystallizes and can cause a brief period of pain worse than before the shot. This usually lasts a day or two and is best treated by application of ice.

With long-term (oral) use, some of the more common side effects of steroids include acne, moon-shaped face, facial hair, weight gain, easy skin bruising, cataracts, blurred vision ,muscle weakness, avascular necrosis of bone and osteoporosis, psychological effects like irritability, agitation, euphoria or depression.
You should consult your doctor about changing the medication or adjusting the steroid dose.
Regards

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Avatar_n_tn
My father also had an allergic reaction to cortisone which was used to treat addison's desease.  The doctors indicated a true allergy was not possible but he became comatose with trouble breathing when the cortisone was administerd.  The cortisone was administered intravenously, and when they took him off, the effect was immediate.  Within a 24 hour period he was consious.  Interestly, he has very adverse reactions to aspirin.
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Avatar_f_tn
Your body does indeed produce cortisone. However, you CAN have allergic reactions to cortisone. I do and it was proven by an allergy specialist in Indianapolis. It's a rare problem but since the cortisone injected into your  body is synthetic it does happen.I break out in huge hives and my skin becomes very hot. Do not let anyone give you cortisone if you suspect you have allergies to it.
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Avatar_f_tn
I too am allergic to cortisone.  My first experience with it was when I was 17 (in 2001) and a dermatologist utilized it as an injection to get rid of a small reoccurring cyst on my nose.  About 1 minute after the injection I felt faint and dizzy.  The doctors gave me lots of orange juice to drink and a cold washcloth to put on my forehead.  After 15 minutes I was perfectly fine.  They assumed that since the injection was in a sensitive area that my body simply was reacting in a form of panic to the idea of a needle in my face.

So, when I got sick during finals week my sophomore year of college (2003) and a doctor recommended I take a cortisone injection in order to have the fastest relief, I figured it wouldn't be a problem.  However, I ended up having the same exact reaction as before, to which 15 minutes of sitting down with a cold compress and drinking some Orange Juice cured it again.

My third experience with cortisone, I came prepared.  I was sick, during finals week again the next year in 2004, and was ready to get my cortisone shot with a cold compress ready and a orange juice in my hand.  I figured if it was only 15 minutes of feeling dizzy and faint in order to be able to study for finals, it was worth it.  I had the same symptoms and used the same remedy, and was good to go, but after about 30 minutes this time.

4th Experience:  Sick in 2006, again came prepared with my OJ.  At this point, I knew what to expect, the doctors knew what to expect, and I was perfectly happy with 15 minutes of feeling miserable, for a quick fix from being so miserably sick.  This time however, my symptoms lasted for an hour.  The doctors still claimed that my reaction was to having anxiety from getting a shot.  I explained to them that anytime I get any other shot I don't have any of these symptoms.  I mean, yeah, I don't like shots, but nobody does, and I've never felt faint from any other injection.

5th Experience, 2007:  It wasn't finals week, I wasn't as miserably sick as before, and I didn't want to push my limits with it lasting an hour as it had before, so the doctor prescribed an oral dose that would take 3 times a day.  I took 1 very small dose (I don't remember the mg amount at this time) and i INSTANTLY couldn't breathe, my throat closed up, felt dizzy, nauseous, and very disoriented.  My husband is an EMT, so he monitored my condition at home, and called the doctor.  After about 2 hours I was finally getting a little better and I went back to the doctor's office for them to verify my vitals etc.

Every doctor to this day thinks I'm crazy when I tell them I'm allergic to cortisone and as such refuse treatment of any and all steroids.  The only way I can possibly get them to understand how serious I am about refusing any steroidal treatment is to literally make a HUGE drama about my throat closing up and becoming disoriented ONLY when I am given BOTH oral and injectable cortisone, for them to not bring it up as an option with me again.  

My theory is to make the doctors and nurses scared to give it to me afraid for both the consequences that would ensue from them having to provide me emergency care and the possibility of a malpractice suit after my urgent declarations.

As a reference, I currently don't have any known problems with naproxen or ibuprofen as others have, but I do have a VERY bad allergy, with similar symptoms, to Morphine that was discovered in 2002 (after my first cortisone injection).  Whether or not that has any correlation, I don't know.

I'm sorry I can't help with any insight into the allergy.  I would love to find out if there is any research being done on this, as it is apparent that most practitioners refuse to believe that it is possible, and it is obvious from all of our (and I'm sure others) experiences that it can and does happen.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have an allergic reaction to cortisone cream and have wondered about the fact that cortisone is produced naturally in the body.  I talked to a coworker about the allergy and low and behold, she was allergic also.  Then I found out we share another healthcare problem. General Anxiety Disorder.  Is there a connection???  I've suffered from undue anxiety my whole life and can't help but wonder where it originates. Any thoughts?
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Avatar_m_tn
   Have had many allergic reactions to many forms of cortisones and asthma medications. At last some genetic factors are being identified that point to re-evaluation of the safety of cortisones.

See;
http://healthfinder.gov/news/newsstory.aspx?docID=657270

Another issue that I have now is due to fungal infection that has become systemic and incurable, specialist said I would never have gotten that infection without cortisones allowing it to get a foothold.

None the less, many allergy specialists are still following medical treatments that are decades out of touch.
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