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Temporary Loss of Vision in Eye
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Temporary Loss of Vision in Eye

Hi, Last year I had two episodes of temporary loss of vision in my eye.  It was like a curtain came down and I could not see out of that eye for around 10 minutes.  I did not have a headache.  I went in for an eye exam and everything looked good.  I then went to my Internist and she had me go in for a Carotid Ultrasound.  That also came back normal.  The doctor labeled it Amaurosis fugax and told me to stay on a daily baby aspirin.  I am a 56 year old female and I have a history of Bicuspid Aortic Valve and Enlarged Aorta.  

After reading an article regarding the relationship of brain aneurysms, bicuspid aortic valves and enlarged aortas, I am wondering if we looked far enough.  The Bicuspid Aortic Foundation has a member who had a CT Scan of her head and they did not find anything.  After having another CT Scan with Contrast and having a Neurologist read it, they found an aneurysm behind her eye and had to operate.  My question is, When I go in for my annual Echo this year at the University of Minnesota, should I also be asking them to do a CT scan with contrast of my head?  Thanks!
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351246_tn?1379685732
Hi!
Yes, there is no harm in getting a CT with contrast or a MRI—which ever one the neurologist feels will be more useful for you. Temporary vision loss in one eye can be due to initial stages of optic neuritis, stoke in the optic nerve, damage to optic nerve, retinal tear, retinal detachment, cataract, glaucoma, bleeding into the eye, macular degeneration etc. It can also be due to benign intracranial hypertension, malignant hypertension, multiple sclerosis, and temporal arteritis. A combined approach of a neurologist and an eye specialist is required for diagnosis. Please take a second opinion from another eye specialist and consult a neurologist too. Take care!

The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
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351246_tn?1379685732
Hi!
Yes, there is no harm in getting a CT with contrast or a MRI—which ever one the neurologist feels will be more useful for you. Temporary vision loss in one eye can be due to initial stages of optic neuritis, stoke in the optic nerve, damage to optic nerve, retinal tear, retinal detachment, cataract, glaucoma, bleeding into the eye, macular degeneration etc. It can also be due to benign intracranial hypertension, malignant hypertension, multiple sclerosis, and temporal arteritis. A combined approach of a neurologist and an eye specialist is required for diagnosis. Please take a second opinion from another eye specialist and consult a neurologist too. Take care!

The medical advice given should not be considered a substitute for medical care provided by a doctor who can examine you. The advice may not be completely correct for you as the doctor cannot examine you and does not know your complete medical history. Hence this reply to your post should only be considered as a guiding line and you must consult your doctor at the earliest for your medical problem.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi, I did go in for and MRA, It is as follows:

EXAM TYPE: MRA , circle of Willis.
TECHNIQUE: Time-of-flight circle of Willis MRA. MIP postprocessing with 3-D reformatting
FINDINGS:
MRA circle of Willis. Basilar artery: Origin arises from bilateral patent vertebral arteries, and gives rise to posterior cerebral arteries bilaterally. No aneurysms.
Right intracranial internal carotid artery. Normal caliber with no dissection or atherosclerotic narrowing. There is branching two normal right middle cerebral artery with hypoplastic right A1 ACA segment. No aneurysms.
Left intracranial internal carotid artery: Normal caliber with no dissection or atherosclerotic narrowing. Branching to the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Left A1 ACA segment dominant. Anterior communicating artery patent. No aneurysms.

IMPRESSIONS:
1. No evidence of aneurysms, significant occlusive or stenotic disease nor arterial dissection.
2. Developmental variant hypoplastic right A1 ACA segment, dominant left A1 ACA segment.

My question is about the impressions. Does the Developmental variant hypoplastic right A1 ACA segment, dominant left A1 ACA segment mean that I should be screened more often and that I am more susceptable to aneurysms?
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