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Cat Food
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Cat Food

Hi. I have a male cat that has a problem with crystals forming in hisurine. The vets has him on a prescription urinary so diet. I am sure itworks but here is my situation and information from my research. Thecost of this product is very expensive and he will not eat the wet food.Plus the contents are from animal by products which I do not like forthe cat. My research shows that water is the number on item to keep thisproblem at bay. That means wet food is best because it contains mostlywater. Also a food that is high in protein low in carbohydrates andphosphorous is best. In my research I found a less expensivealternative. The details are below for you viewing. My general question.If you were in my position. Would you try the below item instead ofstaying with the vets urinary so. If not would you know of a goodalternative that contains real meat that would do the job. I know youcannot give an accurate assessment without seeing the cat. I just wouldlike you viewpoint on this situation. Thanks. Friskies Cuts with Chicken and Gravy % Kcal from Protein 57 Carbs 9 Phosphouus per 100 Kcal 169
Type of Animal
:  
cat
Age of Animal
:  
1
Sex of Animal
:  
Male
Breed of Animal
:  
mixed
Last date your pet was examined by a vet?
:  
March 10, 2012
City
:  
barrie
State/Province
:  
on
Country
:  
canada
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1 Comment
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2054217_tn?1330542034
urinary crystals in cats and dogs is something I have personal experience with...all 3 of my dogs have had either cystals or stones and all 3 are now eating dry MediCal S/O. Yes canned food is better however the food you are recommending is not appropriate and the problem will re-occur. Veterinary approved diets are more costly in the short-term however spending $100 extra a year on food is better then $1000 more on an emergency veterinary bill. The trick to preventing this problem again is constant monitoring and communication wiht your vet. A complete urinalysis should be done every 3-6 months to monitor acidity level and concentration of the urine and then adjustments can be made to avoid a recurrence.
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This Forum's Experts
234713_tn?1283530259
Aleda M Cheng, D.V.M., C.V.ABlank
American Animal Hospital
Randolph, NJ
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