Ask a Pharmacist Expert Forum
What's up with Spironolactone?
About This Forum:

Questions in the Ask a Pharmacist Forum are being answered by pharmacists. Topics include: General information on prescription medication, over-the-counter medications, brand drugs, generic equivalents, common uses, drug therapy, drug interactions, possible side effects, travel medications, pill identification and proper disposal of expired, damaged and unusable medications.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

What's up with Spironolactone?

I've been taking Spironolactone for over a year. I was taking 100 mgs daily, and now it kind of varies. Just recently I had some labs done indicating that my potassium level is low by some standards  (3.5 mmol/L). My sodium is 138 mmol/L, which is sort of on the low side of normal range. And my chloride level is 99 mmol/L, which is near the boarder of being considered low. From what I understand, Spiro should increase my potassium levels and therefore I am suppose to avoid potassium supplementation. I thought this medication would lower my blood pressure, and it doesn't change it at all. It's great for acne though, which is why I started taking it in the first place. However, I'm sort of confused by my labs. I'm always so exhausted and I'm beginning to wonder if my lower sodium levels could effect my thyroid levels.

I have no physician, so I'd appreciate any replies!! Thanks!        
Tags: Spiroaldactone, Thyroid, Blood Pressure, Serum sodium, Serum chloride, Serum potassium
Age
:  
29
Sex
:  
Female
Weight
:  
190
Current Medications
:  
Spiroaldactone
Drug Allergies
:  
N/A
4475871_tn?1355180944
Spironolactone is indicated for a number of therapies, including the treatment of hypokalemia and hypertension. Spironolactone generally does increase serum potassium, and thus the warning to avoid potassium supplementation or a diet high in potassium. There can be numerous causes of low potassium, low sodium, and low chloride. I would recommend  a thorough work-up to rule out any underlying cause to these fluctuations. The prescribing information for spironolactone recommends patients have routine monitoring for fluid electrolyte imbalances (magnesium, sodium, chloride, and potassium). Also, I would recommend you review your current diet for any potential deficiencies.

With regards to your blood pressure, spironolactone is not typically a first-line option for the management of hypertension, unless there are compelling indications for its use vs other drugs. It is often used in addition to other anti-hypertensives, and depending on your current blood pressure and your target goals, you may need one or two drugs to reach your target blood pressure. These may include thiazide diuretics, ACE inhibitors, ARB's (angiotensin II receptor antagonist), beta-blockers, or calcium channel blockers.

It's not possible with the limited information available, to determine the cause of changes to your thyroid tests, or your recent symptoms of tiredness. Symptoms of electrolyte imbalance may include weakness, lethargy, drowsiness, or muscular fatigue. If you suspect these symptoms may be due to spironolactone you should consult with your prescriber regarding the risks vs benefit of continuing.
Blank
This Forum's Experts
5801192_tn?1389204087
Carrie Fu, PharmDBlank
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
How to Silence Your Inner Critic an...
5 hrs ago by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eaters: How to Silence Yo...
Mar 26 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
1344197_tn?1392822771
Blank
Vaginal vs. Laparoscopic Hysterecto...
Feb 19 by J. Kyle Mathews, MD, DVMBlank