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hypertension med expectations
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hypertension med expectations
I have been being treated with atenolol then started lisinopril @ 10mg, upped to 20 then 40mg over the last 2 months with no change in my BP. It is still 160/100 range.  Is it likely I will show a response to these meds over the next several weeks?  Are some people just resistant to the meds?   Thank you.  
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4475871 tn?1355180944
Lisinopril may take up to 2- 4 weeks to lower blood pressure to optimal range for some patients. You would likely have seen the benefits of lisinopril in lowering your blood pressure if you have been taking the 40mg dose for 2 months now. The usual dosing range for lisinopril is 10- 40mg per day when treating hypertension. Doses up to 80mg have been used but do not appear to show greater effectiveness.

As your blood pressure remains elevated, it is necessary to review your past medical history and current medication regimen with your physician. You may discuss adding another anti-hypertensive or increasing the dose of your current anti-hypertensives such as hydrochlorothiazide if this is an option for you. Different people may require different combinations of medications to reach their optimal blood pressure, and there are various drug classes to choose from. In some cases, based on your past medical history, there may be compelling indications to choose one anti-hypertensive over another.  

Also, there are a number of factors that can lead to resistant hypertension, such as: excess sodium intake, inadequate diuretic therapy, or excessive alcohol intake. Some medications may also cause fluid retention and/ or cause hypertension as a side-effect.
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