Asthma and Allergy Expert Forum
Food Allergies
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding: Allergies, Asthma, Chronic Cough, Sinusitis, and other Respiratory Disorders.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

Food Allergies

I had an allergic reaction to a sweet potato fry I had at a restaurant.  At first I was dizzy, then got stomach cramps, then a hot flush and a red rash on my face and chest.  My heart was racing and I was having a hard time breathing.  Luckily two benadryls helped much.  At first I thought it was the sulfites in the fries (that's what a friend commented).  But the fries were mixed with shrimps. So I went for bloodwork and my allergist said I'm allergic to apples, oats, beef, hazelnuts, rye, shrimp and peanuts.  I had oatmeal almost every morning and peanut butter about a week ago.  I had beef two weeks ago and got a bit dizzy but blamed it on being tired and stressed.  How is it possible to be allergic to oats, apples and peanuts and have no reactions after eating those?  My second question is, if my IGE was 1370 before and I went for bloodwork now and it was 1544, can it have increased because I've been eating oats, peanuts and apples things I'm allergic to and didn't know before?
242587_tn?1355427710
It would be wise to check-out all the ingredients in the restaurant’s sweet potato fries, by contacting the Chef or restaurant Manager.  It is quite possible that peanuts, included in the recipe or peanut oil used in frying, could have caused your serious reaction.  Should this severe reaction should ever happen again, you should be taken to the nearest Emergency Room as quickly as possible, especially since subsequent reactions are often more severe than the first.  Should you have Benadryl or another anti-histamine with you take it but, do not delay waiting for it to take effect.

As for your question, positive allergy testing need not be associated with a clinically evident allergic reaction to that substance.  

The apparent increase in IgE, is likely to be within the range of variability and not really an increase.  In most clinical laboratories, the upper limit of normal IgE levels is usually between 150-300.  Your elevated level suggests a sustained reaction.  You should contact your Allergist without delay to determine the next steps to be taken and, until then, avoid all the foods you have listed.  You may want to ask your current Allergist if it might be helpful to seek the opinion of another Allergist with experience, an interest and expertise in the diagnosis and management of food allergy.

Good luck
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank