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Tracheal Malacia
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Tracheal Malacia

My son was diagnosed with trachea malacia at birth, was delivered by C-section/ breech.  1st I noticed that he was making  a seal-like/ whooping cough sound when he began to cry after my recovery time/ at delivery his cry seemed normal.  An Ear/nose/throat spec. did a scope to look at his trachea. Spec. said there was some edema around the trachea the trachea was extra soft and that his epiglotis looked under developed. Spec. said that the swelling could go down and there won't be problem or he may have trechea malacia. One month exactly he began to cough and then it reached the point where he could not catch his breathe from coughing to hard. He was hospitalized. The doctor said hat he caught a little cold and the cold aggrivated it into a stridor or something. He was administered antibiotics and breathing treatments.After ten day we were at home. Now it seems that the coughing and crying brought out an inguinal & very small Umbilical Hernia. We are going to have the surgery to repair the Hernias but while he is sadated the Pediatrician is requesting that the Pediatric Sugeon take a look at his vocal cords. Now my question is should I let them do this and why? If my son,s trachea can only develope and he grow out of it, wouldn't this possibly make it worse? I am being told that this procedure will not harm him and that it will tell us if he will have any future problems and while he is sudated it is the best time.  I also know that the trachea is sensitive and he is breathing fine, and gaining weight.  Please respond as soon as possible.
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Tracheomalacia or bronchomalacia is common at birth and the great majority of children do “grow-out of it.”  If, as you say, “he is breathing fine”, he may already be growing out of it.  The prognosis for primary bronchomalacia and tracheomalacia is excellent, because airflow improves as the airways grow.  Wheezing at rest is usually gone by age 3 years.

His pediatrician is right in stating that this would be an ideal time to examine the vocal cords and bronchi, but it is unclear as to what might be accomplished by examination of your son’s vocal cords, especially when disease of the cords has, heretofore, not been an issue; what actions might be taken on the basis of the exam?  The trachea and bronchi have been the source of his problem.  In addition, unless the pediatric surgeon also does thoracic surgery and has had extensive experience with bronchoscopic examination of the airways, he/she might not be the best person to perform the examination.  The proposed examination of your son’s larynx and also of the trachea and major bronchi under anesthesia is generally a very safe procedure but it would lengthen the duration of anesthesia, albeit only slightly, and all procedures carry some risk.

I suggest that you request a second opinion from a pediatric pulmonologist, before agreeing to this additional procedure.

Good luck.
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