Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) Community
ASD
About This Community:

WELCOME to the ATRIAL SEPTAL DEFECT COMMUNITY: This Patient-To-Patient Community is for discussions relating to Atrial Septal Defect (ASD) which is a hole in the part of the septum that separates the atria (the upper chambers of the heart). This hole allows oxygen-rich blood from the left atrium to flow into the right atrium instead of flowing into the left ventricle as it should. This means that oxygen-rich blood gets pumped back to the lungs, where it has just been, instead of going to the body.

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ASD

WHAT HAPPENS IF ASD IN ELDERS AGED 50 YEARS IS NOT REPAIRED. ASD IS NOT NOTICED IN MY CASE TILL 49 YEARS. I DID NOT FACE ANY PROBLEM SO FAR.
PLEASE INFORM IF THERE IS ANY NON-SURGICAL TREATMENT FOR  ASD IN ELDERS AGED 50 YEARS.
FROM-- BALU
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367994_tn?1304957193
In a person with an atrial septal defect, there's an opening in the wall that separates the right and left upper chambers.  This hole in the wall lets oxygen-rich blood from the left atrium mix with oxygen-poor blood on the other side.

A small atrial septal defect may never cause any problems. Small atrial septal defects often close during infancy.

Larger defects can cause mild to life-threatening problems:
Pulmonary hypertension. If a large atrial septal defect goes untreated, increased blood flow to your lungs increases the blood pressure in the lung arteries (pulmonary hypertension).
In rare cases, pulmonary hypertension can cause permanent lung damage, and it becomes irreversible. This complication, called Eisenmenger syndrome, usually develops over many years and occurs only in a small percentage of people with large atrial septal defects.  Hope this helps.
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1137980_tn?1281289046
Hi i read your post.  The procedure in itself is pretty easy and with women they just make a small incision in the chest area that is hardly seen.  Many times they just put a patch on to repair the ASD ....there is risk of less than 1% during the procedure in most cases however Saitata if you do not repair it you could open yourself up to alot of other things that may not be as easy to correct for you in the future. Medical science now gives us so many options for treatment that its amazing,  Because you are not "feeling" anything wrong does not mean that nothing is wrong and if your heart doctor is telling you it needs to be done you need to trust him/her and their diagnosis because they only have your best interest at heart here so to speak.  If it were my body i would no doubt not play Russian Roulette with my life and i would personally probably get it done sooner rather then later when it might not be so easy to correct because you decided to wait.  It is a personal decision that you make with your own life but i would trust my doctors for sure. Please let us know what you decided and if you did decide to go ahead with the procedure let us know how it went...we are here for you Saitata and good luck making your decision.....
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Avatar_dr_f_tn
Hi. ASD is a form of congenital heart that enables blood flow between the left and right atrium via septum. This results in the mixing of arterial and venous blood which may result to shunt development. If left uncorrected, the pressure in the right side of the heart will be greater than the left. In effect, the pressure gradient will reverse, and a more dangerous, oxygen-poor right-to-left shunt will exist. Studies show that high-risk elderly patients with ASD can be safely treated with a fenestrated occluder, a device that allows an overflow of blood in both directions in case of heart failure. To know more about other treatment options available, consult your doctor. Hope this helps.
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