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Can Zoloft cause tics
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Can Zoloft cause tics

My son is 91/2 years old and has mild Asperger's Syndrome and OCD.  His has been on Zoloft for about 8 mths.  It has helped him tremendously in the area of anxiety and panic attacks.  I am worried now about some possible side effects.  He has started having tics (eye crossing, head movements up and down, flipping his lip with his finger, shoulder shrugging etc.)  He has done motor stereotypy since he was 4mnths. old and I know when he is stimming, these look more like tics and he can't seem to control them.  He has also developed some occasionl aggressive impulsions toward others when he gets mad and frusterated and some sleep difficulties.  
In your opinion, do you feel there are tic side effects from the zoloft and is it worth taking him off the meds if I know the anxiety problems will re-present themselves?  I don't know what to do and what is best for him?
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Sertraline (brand name Zoloft) is a type of an antidepressant known as a selective serotonin uptake inhibitor.  It is sometimes prescribed to treat anxiety disorders and it sounds like this is the reason that your son is on the medication.  While tics are not a common side effect of Zoloft, any concerns that you have regarding your son’s medication should be brought to the attention of the doctor prescribing the medication immediately.   With children diagnosed with autism-spectrum disorders, it can sometimes be difficult to differentiate tics from stereotypy or some forms of self-injurious behavior.  Consider taking your son to a specialist in involuntary movement disorders.  A specialist in the area should be able to better tell if what your son is exhibiting is, in fact a tic, and identify appropriate treatment.
2 Comments
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387056_tn?1200447377
Your son's case sounds far different than mine, but I did develop an involuntary head tick after taking Lexapro for two months.
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Jason C Bourret, Ph.D., BCBA-DBlank
The New England Center for Children
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New England Center for Children
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