Autism & Asperger's Syndrome Expert Forum
can they live a normal life?
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Questions in the Autism & Asperger's Syndrome forum are answered by researchers at the New England Center for Children. Topics covered include Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Antisocial Personality Disorder, Asperger Syndrome, Autism, blindness, bullying, clinical depression, deafness, dyslexia, mental retardation, and social alienation.

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can they live a normal life?

My son was diagnosed with Asperger's a couple years ago. They said most of his life that it was just ADHD but he was behind in development. He turned 18 a last year and is graduating this year. I am really worried about him living on his own and being an adult. He's very immature for his age and kind of gets hung up on things like plants. He also gets angry or his feelings hurt very easily. At this point I don't know how I should be treating him. He IS 18 but I still seem to treat him like a kid because I'm not sure how else to treat him. Also I'm wondering if people with this problem live on their own and have jobs. I'm really confused about this whole thing.
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There is no way to answer this other than to just note that everyone is an individual. You know your son far better than I do and you’re in a much better position to speak to his strengths and weaknesses. All of the ASD diagnoses are behavioral. They don’t tell you about causes, they just apply a name to a cluster of behavioral criteria. Everyone with an Asperger’s diagnosis is different, some lead very typical lives, others have more difficulties. Almost anything is possible but the thing to do is to make sure he gets whatever help he needs to continue to work on areas in need of improvement. Deal with individual issues rather than the diagnosis as a whole. He’s your son and an adult and should probably be treated like one. But, that doesn’t mean that, like anyone really, he doesn’t need the support and assistance of his parents. The thing to do is to keep an eye on things, help him recognize the things he could use more help with, and make sure he seeks out the assistance he needs.
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Hi kim,
I know what your going through my husband has aspergers syndrome he is quite capable of living on his own and yes they do get frustrated easily the best way for that to be handled is to "take a break" they also tend to know a lot on one particuar subject. Being a young adult he will make some stupid mistakes all I will say is support him and show that no matter what you'll be there or he will be afraid to talk to you when he does need you.
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This Forum's Experts
340676_tn?1383325484
Jason C Bourret, Ph.D., BCBA-DBlank
The New England Center for Children
Southborough, MA
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Richard B. Graff, PhD, BCBA-DBlank
New England Center for Children
Southborough, MA
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