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Does my teenager have Aspergers?
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Does my teenager have Aspergers?

My 15 year old step daughter is very inteligent as in gifted. Her father and I have been together since she was 7 years old. I remember ever at 7 she did not want to hug or kiss her dad or anyone for that matter. She has lived with us for the past 4 years. She does not make eye contact unless you make her. She is not out going (although she does play volley ball and this year she did try out for the musical) she will not start a conversation and when you try to have a conversation with her all she does is answer the questions you ask. She takes things people say very literally and does not get it when people are joking with her. She recently started counseling and after the first session they told me to get her to see a psychiatrist because they feel she needs medication for anxioty. Could this be a form of aspergers?
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First I would say that you need to find out what her life was like and if anything ever happen to her before she came to live with you and her father. The Counseling she help her with anything she has been threw.But the sad part is that they can't tell you anything you will have to wait and see if she can tell you when she is ready,that is if something bad has happen to her that you all don't know about.

If you really feel like she needs something to help her I would make sure she take 's a Multivitamin and Vitamin B6 and B12 and Omega 3-6-9 they are very good for you and she should take them.

Be there for her and let her know you are there for her even if to just listen and not say a word back to her.

Dose she talk to her Mom at all?
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1173196_tn?1292920090
It does sound like possible Aspergers. I would talk to her pediatrician. If they agree, they can reccomend a child psychologist. I wouldn't put her on anything until you are sure of what you are dealing with.
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Avatar_f_tn
It is hard to tell if it is Aspergers or if she is just being a teenager and avoiding eye contact and not being social with her parents.  If the doctor is saying anxiety then maybe that is the problem.  

Does she have a majority of these symptoms?  It sounds like she has the communication problems, but does she have any other symptoms.   I copied this from another site.  

Problems with social skills: Children with Asperger's syndrome generally have difficulty interacting with others and often are awkward in social situations. They generally do not make friends easily.

Eccentric or repetitive behaviors: Children with this condition may develop odd, repetitive movements, such as hand wringing or finger twisting.

Unusual preoccupations or rituals: A child with Asperger's syndrome may develop rituals that he or she refuses to alter, such as getting dressed in a specific order.

Communication difficulties: People with Asperger's syndrome may not make eye contact when speaking with someone. They may have trouble using facial expressions and gestures, and understanding body language. They also tend to have problems understanding language in context.

Limited range of interests: A child with Asperger's syndrome may develop an intense, almost obsessive, interest in a few areas, such as sports schedules, weather, or maps.

Coordination problems: The movements of children with Asperger's syndrome may seem clumsy or awkward.

Skilled or talented: Many children with Asperger's syndrome are exceptionally talented or skilled in a particular area, such as music or math.

Keep me posted
Athena
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127529_tn?1331844380
I suggest you Google a lady called Michelle Garcia Winner, she works with teenagers with Autism and Aspergers and has some great info on "The social mind". High functioning kids with Aspergers often have a great deal of anxiety that basically occurs because they are smart enough to realize they are a little different, realize they can be awkward socially and want to be normal and "fit in" but they don't know how, it can be very stressful for a young adult in that situation and anxiety and even depression are common. A physcologist assessment is a good starting point but be aware that some of these really high functioning kids pass the standard tests often given. Counselling may help her too if you can get the counselor to understand her social difficulties.
Best of luck.
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Avatar_n_tn
Your stepdaughter sounds very similar to my 17 year old daughter who has Aspergers. I suggest you check out the Aspergers Society of Ontario website.  They have lots of helpful information.  It is important that you educate yourself as much as possible. Once you understand why she does some of the things she does it will be easier to help her.  For example, people with Aspergers will often look away or have no eye contact when you're talking to them because it can be difficult for them to focus on the two senses at the same time - visual and auditory.  So, although it looks like they're not paying attention when they're looking away, they are actually doing so in order to focus on hearing what you are saying.  I have lots more to share but not enough space here.
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Avatar_n_tn
Your stepdaughter sounds very similar to my 17 year old daughter who has Aspergers. I suggest you check out the Aspergers Society of Ontario website.  They have lots of helpful information.  It is important that you educate yourself as much as possible. Once you understand why she does some of the things she does it will be easier to help her.  For example, people with Aspergers will often look away or have no eye contact when you're talking to them because it can be difficult for them to focus on the two senses at the same time - visual and auditory.  So, although it looks like they're not paying attention when they're looking away, they are actually doing so in order to focus on hearing what you are saying.  I have lots more to share but not enough space here.
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Avatar_f_tn
She may have characteristics of a person on the autism spectrum. It would be best to have her see a child neurologist since autism is a neurological disorder.
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