Back & Neck Community
lumbar spine nerve pinched, help reading the MRI results
About This Community:

This patient support community is for discussions relating to back and neck problems, exercise, pain, sleeping, and physical therapy.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
Blank Blank

lumbar spine nerve pinched, help reading the MRI results

the MRI Impression reads:

1. At L4-L5 there is a large partially sequestered left paramedian cranially migrated disc herniation effacing the ventral thecal sac and left L4 nerve root.

2. At L5-S2, in addition to the degenerative lateral recess and neuroforaminal narrowing, there is a broad based cenral to left paramdian disc herniation which is leading to effacement upon the ventral thecal sac and exiting L5 nerve roots, left greater than right.

Can you please explain this in lay mans terms,  they sent me for the MRI because they thought I had a pinched femoral nerve on my left lower back side?

Please help

Thank you

Mary
Related Discussions
3 Comments Post a Comment
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Dear Mary,
In english, you have an impinged nerve at the L4-L5 and L5 vertebro bodies.  Basically, you have two discs that are touching your nerve roots.  The MRI states left greater than right, I would guess that you have pain that radiates down your leg and its worse in the left leg.  There are several things that can be done to help with your pain.  I would also guess by the MRI that your pain is pretty bad.
Please let me know how things turn out.  I wish you the best of luck and I hope you get to feeling better.
SLCPMOM
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
You mention that several things can be done to help me, can you give me a list of what some of those things are?  I've been suffering with this horrible pain in my entire left leg for far too long, I'm ready for some relief.

Thank you

Mary
Blank
Avatar_f_tn
Mary,
Sorry I didn't get back to you sooner.  Epidural steroid injections help with pinched nerves.  There are also transforaminals, caudal injections and facet nerve injections. All of these injections are done using some kind of steroid and lidocaine.  The steroid helps calm the nerves and reduces pain after usually about 4-6 days.  The lidocaine usually reduces pain immediately and for about the following 4 hours.  Another noninvasive procedure is a Percuteanous disc decompression.  If you have Blue cross insurance, they won't pay for it.  Physical therapy also can sometimes help to expand the disc space and reduce pressure on the nerves.  I hope this helps.
Blank
Post a Comment
To
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
Back & Neck Community Resources
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
Top Pain Answerers
7721494_tn?1411517293
Blank
philnoir
Four Corners, CO
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
Kalvin
Milwaukee, WI
1326416_tn?1370930601
Blank
shinty
Just south of Boston, MA
1248623_tn?1406812015
Blank
EdwardPB
Pontiac, IL
Avatar_m_tn
Blank
Kermit the Hermit
Lost My Mind & House, IL
Avatar_f_tn
Blank
remar
st. louis, MO