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strong winds.. fallen baby bird... no parents..
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strong winds.. fallen baby bird... no parents..

we had a huge dust storm out here a few days ago.. while i was in town tonight.. my sons found a baby bird in the desert.. obviously... the baby bird was far from home.. he must be just a day or two old.. because he is still transparent.. you can just tell that he is new born..  anyway.. i freaked out.. because i just couldnt leave him out there.. there was a nest with him.. but.. no trees anywhere.. and he came from a tree.. but due to the weather.. he musthave blown far from his tree... anyway.. i took him in.. and i attempted to feed him..

if anyone knows what i can do to help this little baby bird.. please let me know!! I just had a baby  boy 2 weeks ago.. and i cant bear to think about letting that baby bird die.  i have hom ina  box.. i read that he has to stay 80- 90 degrees.. so i have a heating pad on low.. in a box.. and i put him in the box .. ( hes in his nest)...i also fed him what i thought would be ok for him. which was some smashed up meat... and some baby formula..  he took it just fine.. ( well.. i had to use a syringe..)

he seems ok .. but.. i would love to hear from someone who has been through this..

thankyou
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8 Comments Post a Comment
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98010_tn?1305903335
We have tried several times to rescue orphaned baby birds before without much luck.  The last time we found an abandoned bird we took it in and called around to local vets until we found a wildlife rescue center.  Maybe you have one in your area too.  In our area anyway, this is exactly what they do, they take in injured and stray wild animals and try to rehabilitate them until they are strong enough to be released back into the wild.  I think we found the wildlife center in our phone book, but maybe a vet in your area can help point you in the right direction.  Sorry I couldn't be of more help.  Hope you find someone in your area to help you out.  Congratulations on your baby boy!
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184674_tn?1360864093
First of all...is the bird still alive? I noticed your post was from 8 days ago from this one.
Secondly, do you know what kind of bird it is? This is important because different species of birds eat different things--your baby bird may not be a meat-eater, but rather a berry-eater. I also noticed you said you mixed the syringe food for the bird with baby formula. I don't think this would be a good idea because birds are not mammals and do not drink milk, and therefore they do not have the digestive system to break down lactose.
Okay, here's what I'd suggest, from having successful experience raising a baby mockingbird to adulthood and releasing it back into the wild.
First, contact a wildlife preserve, veterinary clinic, or humane society. Secondly, go to a pet store and get some baby bird food. Then, whether or not your bird is a meat/bug-eater or a berry-eater, go to a grocery store and get a couple jars of baby food, either meats or fruits/veggies (stage 1 baby food, of course). Syringe-feed the bird until it has a considerable amount of pinfeathers, then start encouraging it to eat on its own. You have to feed the bird about every 1/2 hour; they have high metabolisms and parent birds fly back and forth from the nest ALL DAY EVERY DAY getting their young food and regurgitating it for them until they can teach the young to fly. Make sure you also get water into the baby bird by syringe about every 15-30 minutes so it does not dehydrate. Keep the bird warm until it has pinfeathers that cover most of its body, and cover its box or cage with a towel at night so it does not get a draft.
If your baby bird is still alive at this point, best of luck to you! I hope this helps!
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187666_tn?1331176945
I appreciate your concern for the baby bird and that you want to help. But I  must mention that it would be best to find a wildlife care center nearby and take the baby animal there. Not only will they be able to identify it and feed it the right type of food (digestive systems of various species cannot process the incorrect foods) but they are the only folks that can care for native wildlife legally. Wild native birds (not the non-natives like starlings, house sparrows and rock pigeons - the common city pigeon) are protected by the Migratory Bird Species Act. You can be a good samaritan and get help for the baby or injured bird but you cannot care for it long term. Trying to give a bird water by mouth can be tricky too since the glottis (the opening to the lungs) is right on the tongue. All too often people have accidently caused aspiration pneumonia by giving the bird fluids. If you have an idea where the nest might be but can't reach it, you can make an artificial nest and attach it nearby. Often the parent will continue to feed the youngster at the new site. Just a helpful hint. (I am a licensed rehabber BTW)
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237452_tn?1189759428
it may be alot to read but i found this on the internet  trying to find a way to feed the bird i found im going to try it idk if it works but u should try it to

First and foremost: Birds lack the digestive enzyme necessary to utilize milk as food. They have no lactose. Some human babies are born lactose-intolerant too. If one continues to feed such a child normal milk, the results will be tragic. The same applies to a bird. Milk never enters the world of a baby bird. It is a product, a substance unique to mammals. Because of this, bread and milk – a classic in people’s mind – should not ever be used to feed a baby bird. The milk produces diarrhea, and even the carbohydrates found in the bread, hardly a food to grow on, can be only partially absorbed.
In almost all cases, commonly available commercial baby parrot formula is an effective balanced diet for a young bird, fed warm from a syringe to keep track of quantity consumed, at a temperature between 100F – 105F. The reason for this is that the temperature of the mother is about 106F – 108F. The food she regurgitates for her babies will not be too far off that temperature. If it is, the babies may refuse to eat, or the chilling effect of the food will slow the activity of the stomach and intestines leading to impaction and soured food in the crop and stomach. This formula is in effect a hot cereal. Therefore allow it to "cook" briefly; otherwise it will be gritty to the bird and unacceptable, and will quickly separate out from the water and sit like silt in the crop. Flash cook the formula and allow cooling to the desired temperature.
  Do not, ever, save cooked formula from one feeding to the next, within half an hour the bacterial and fungal growth, even in the fridge, would give you goose bumps. At my clinic we use disposable plastic "Dixie Cups" and a microwave. What is not used is thrown away with the cup. A technical note: microwave cooking "Fluffs" the formula a little more than stovetop cooking. Therefore the nutrient and calorie content in each milliliter is reduced. It may be necessary to increase volume fed by 10% to compensate, if growth and body weight begin to slide. So how much does that translate into? As aggravating and/or intimidating as it may be here is a situation where one must learn to work with grams, kilograms, milliliters, not pounds ounces and teaspoons. (A milliliter is the same as a "cc", and the labels are used interchangeably. The English system is just not sensitive enough for a creature so small. Invest in an electronic scale accurate to two grams. Acquire a selection of different size syringes. Practice with these measurements until they begin to have meaning for you, until you can relate 20 grams of body weight to an image of a certain body size. The loss of a few grams of body weight by a baby bird may not be obvious to the naked eye, but it means something terrible is happening inside, or is certainly about to. There should be a daily increase of 10 to 15% from the previous day’s body weight. No growth or weight loss is not good news. Something is wrong. Fine. But how much should the bird be eating in the first place? There are detailed charts for species and age. The solid rule of thumb however, is that you should feed 10% of the bird’s body weight 3 to 4 times daily. If the baby weighs 1½ ounce, how much do you feed? It is not easy to calculate, as ounces since one ounce equals 30 ml., 1½ ounce equals 45 ml, and you should feed 4.5 ml of an applesauce thick formula, if using a microwave and the food is "fluffy" that 10% increase only translates into a maximum of 10% of 4.5, which is 0.45 or about half a milliliter. Not much really but it may be important.
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Avatar_n_tn
hello my name is taila and i am 12 and i found a baby bird and i dont want to leave it but my mum doesnt want it what do i do?  and other than what you fed him what can i feed my bird?    and i also think both his legs are broken because they are both curved in and wont move and he falls over all the time  he is also 11 centimetres high

please write back

thankyou
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187666_tn?1331176945
You don't have many choices. One - if you haven't had the bird very long (under 48 hours) you can put it in a box (like a shoebox), line it with tissues to make an artificial nest, then tack it or hang it in a tree very close to where you found it. But if the bird is injured (broken legs) it needs medical care soon. Bird bones heal quickly and so a vet or wildlife rehabber would need to splint the legs. If the legs are simply bowed out, then it sounds like a congenital deformity and the bird probably wouldn't survive in the wild in any case. Often the parent birds seem to sense when a baby isn't doing well and they will reject the young one. I know, it's not the way we handle things but for them, survival is extremely important. A bird with bent legs that can't perch any place won't last a month out in the wild.
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Avatar_n_tn
help help help i just found a baby bird yesterday and its feathers have not come in yet ! i have raised a wild dove before and it lived!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
i have been feeding it whenever its mouth opens grasshoppers and he takes it!!!     any idea what to feed it PPPPPLLLLLLEEEEAASE help
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Avatar_n_tn
oh and my dad thinks  its some kind of jay
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