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Do I have some sort of disease affecting my weight and muscle growth?
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Do I have some sort of disease affecting my weight and muscle growth?

Do I have some sort of disease affecting my weight and muscle growth?

Im 16, 110 lbs, and im 6'0'' tall. I used to weight 120 pounds but I have gone down in weight for no apparent reason. my eating habits are the same and have not changed. I feel completely normal (not out of energy). I dont see how its possible for me to even be this skinny. My mom is skinny and my dad is skinny for a guy but nothing like me. My sister is normal and my brother is definatly overweight. Sophmore year of high school when I was shorter I weighed more than I do now and im taller. Is there something wrong with my muscle growth? also I have really skinny bones.
Tags: Weight, growth, muscles, Eating, human growth hormone teenagers, human growth hormone, Thyroid, Hyperthyroidism
1741471_tn?1369660473


Hi there and thanks so much for posting this question.
From your description this could be a various of reasons although I am going to give you my take on it. In my opinion you are dealing with two very important concepts such as hormones and DNA. I will provide my suggestion and share some links. However you can post this question in any other forum also related to metabolism and teenagers.

How much weight have you lost? If you have lost more than a 3 pounds per week you need to get some test done mainly metabolic testing.  There are two hormones that are crucial for muscle growth development: Human Growth hormone, testosterone and Thyroid Gland.

Human growth hormones (HGH) are naturally produced in the pituitary glands of the human body. They play a role in influencing a person's physical and sexual growth, as well as the rate of metabolism. HGH supplementation is considered a treatment option for teens with stunted growth or teens who are midgets. HGH supplementation is most effective when shortness is detected early, as stunted growth is usually a result of the body's inability to produce as much HGH as required.

Read more: HGH Treatment in Teens | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/way_5732291_hgh-treatment-teens.html#ixzz2EfV036CR


The gland Thyroid in the human body can cause body fluctuations either gaining or losing weight. Other hormones can affect proper functioning as well so that is why you should get some tests done.
At 16 there are plenty metabolism changes in the body so that is why you should increase protein intake and meal frequency with changes in your training.  

Lets speak about Metabolism:

• “Structural and compound exercises” are types of exercises that require a maximum amount of energy because multiple joints are involved like a Squat with a Press. Sitting down and doing a biceps curl is like the exact opposite of hard core metabolic training.
• A metabolic training purist may tell you almost all exercises should be structural, which means the spine is loaded and the legs are engaged to some degree during the exercise
• Human growth hormone has acquired a bad reputation, thanks to athletes who have abused it in their quest for stardom. But for tens of thousands of children whose growth and development are stymied by a deficiency of growth hormone, daily injections of this biologically synthesized growth stimulant can put them on track toward normality.
• http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/04/health/04brod.html

MUSCLE GROWTH IN TEENAGERS
http://www.livestrong.com/article/301122-muscle-growth-in-teenagers/


LOW THYROID FUNCTION IN TEENS
Hypothyroidism is a glandular disease in which your thyroid fails to produce enough hormones. The thyroid gland is located in your neck below your Adam's apple. It is responsible for making the hormones that control your metabolism. Having a low-functioning or underactive thyroid can cause numerous health symptoms, including fatigue and hair loss. Though hypothyroidism is most common in middle-aged and older women, teenagers can develop the disease, as well.

Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/222647-low-thyroid-function-in-teens/#ixzz2EfVhQvB1
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