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Frontal lobe tumor removal
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Frontal lobe tumor removal

Hi,
My partner has just had an operation to remove a stage 2 tumor from his left side frontal lobe. Although he has had this surgery twice before without complication, this one was different. He is currently 2 days post-op and cannot move his right leg at all, very minimal movement in his right arm (can squeeze fingers but not move joints). He says he can feel normally when touched. The doctors are all saying different things. I want to know if it is likely he will recover fully? Also apart from the normal physio/ OT is there anything else that can help such as hypnotherapy etc. Is this common? Will he be ok?
Thanks
Tags: brain storke, brain tumor, brain tumor removal, tumor removal recovery, brain map
1741471_tn?1369660473
Hi there and thanks so much for posting this question. Please feel free to post to the Neurology Forum as well since involve neurology questions. However I will give you my opinion.
Your partner’s symptoms are not that uncommon after surgery and most of the times there are different opinions from doctors. It looks like the brain needs sometime to readjust and see how it will recover.

Since your partner has suffered the tumor in the left side of the brain that is why he is experiencing mobility limitations in the right side of the body. The left side of the brain controls the right side of the body and viceversa, in what is considered a brain map.
Homunculus is a term used, generally, in various fields of study to refer to any representation of a human being. Throughout history, it has referred specifically to the concept of a miniature, fully formed human body, for exampl. In current context, in scientific fields, a homunculus may refer to any scale model of the human body that, in some way, illustrates physiological, psychological, or other abstract human characteristics or functions.

http://harmonicresolution.com/Sensory%20Homunculus.htm

In other words that is why your partner is experiencing some limited mobility. Once that the brain readjust after injury it is when you can start a specific exercise program. The good news is that there is room for fully recovery maybe with some impediment. As the doctors and OT’s know they may be doing very specific exercises to recover mobility and restore the motor circuits of the brain and the sensory proprioceptors. In my experience hand coordination activities help, some cognitive exercises that require coordination and sensory exercises.
To your original concern hypnosis has shown beneficial with brain stroke patients http://www.altmedweb.com/types/hypnotherapy/hypnosis-can-help-stroke-rehabilitation

I hope this helps and I wish your partner a fast recovery!

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