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Alzheimers and genetics
My dad's twin brother was recently diagnosed as having Alzheimer's (age 72). Does this mean my dad will certainly get it? I am prepared to take care of him, so this is not an issue.  I am more concerned because I have twin daughters, age 7, and I am wondering if this is a problem they will inherit.  They are so young that I don't want to concern myself with this except to see if there's any testing or any reason to do so at this point.  Mostly concerned about Dad and whether this is a certainty for him.  Thanks!
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Hi chez_moi,

I just finished reading your comments. Just because your dad's twin brother
was recently diagnosed with Alzheimer's doesn't necessarily mean your
dad will get Alzheimers. This is my own opinion based on what I've heard
about Alzheimers. I know it can be hereditary , but not necessarily so I
wouldn't worry about your twin daughters. Eve
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168348 tn?1379360675
I know twins in same situation and one one has Alzheimers.  Do let us know what your doctor thinks if you ask next time you have an appointment.
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There is a new break through research that found a vitamin that will protect from Alzheimer's. It protects the brain from shrinking.
Vit B complex 100 mg to 125 mg.daily, B complex has eight B vitamins and it should all have the same amount .  

Huperzine A daily is another supplement that they use for Alzheimer's , anti cholinesterase (inhibitor) , cholinesterase, they find is increased in Alheimer's brain.

I have been taking both and I can tell the difference.  :)
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From what I understand, Alzheimer's that is diagnosed in elderhood is not nearly as heritable as early-onset Alzheimer's is.  I really don't think the genetics of elder-onset Alzheimer's is very well understood.  Also, even though being an identical twin does elevate the risk of both twins' getting the same diseases, it does not make it a certainty.  If the twins are fraternal, the shared risk is no greater than for any other pair of siblings.  

I'm saying all of this just from my general reading and not as any kind of expert on Alzheimer's.  You could consider talking with a genetic counselor, to get a detailed risk assessment.  Someone who works as a genetic counselor would be up on all the latest research.  But I can tell you this:  nothing in life is 100%.  

By the time your daughters are grown, and you would have to talk to them about their risk of dementia, you will know the outcome for your father.  I don't think there is anything special about the fact that your children are twins that will elevate their risk.  It would simply be a matter of the family history.  In other words, your uncle did not get Alzheimer's because he is a twin.  He just got it.  Your father may not get Alzheimer's, and you may not, in which case your daughters' risk will be low.
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