Breast Cancer Expert Forum
Anechoic areas
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Anechoic areas

I had a subqutaneous mastectomy done in 1987 due to fibrocystic disease and have silicone implants.  I have had no problems until recently when I discovered a lump under my left arm.  The mammogram report recommended an ultasound be done and revealed that the implants looked intact and not ruptured.  The ultrasound stated that in the area of palpable abnormality three anechoic areas were seen (corresponding to 3 hypoechoic nodules) measuring up to 0.6 cm in diameter, as well as a benign-appearing axillary node on the right side  .8x0.8x1.1cm. and recommended an MRI.  Is this diagnosis symtomatic of anything in particular?   Should a biopsy be done in addition to or instead of an MRI?  Is this diagnosis something to be concerned about, followed up, or indicative of something that could be serious?  What is your interpretation of the findings in terms I can understand?
Thanks for whatever information you may provide.

    
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Dear congolfski,   Anechoic means that the areas seen are fluid-filled, which would indicate a cyst, which is a benign (non-cancerous) finding.  The axillary (under the arm), lymph node seen does not look suspicious for cancer.  The recommendation for the MRI may be to further evalute the breast tissue that may be difficult to evaluate fully by mammogram and ultrasound due to the implant.  There may not be any reason to do more regarding the cysts, unless they were causing you discomfort, or their is a question of whether or not they are cysts.
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Avatar_n_tn
the more echoes, the harder something is. Hypo, and an -echoic mean little or no echos, which means the tissue is soft, like fat. Cancer typically is hyperechoic, meaning lots of echos. What you describe sounds like benign harmless lumps, possibly normal lymph nodes. Sometimes it helps a lot more to be examined by someone familiar with how things feel, rather than relying on xrays and similar tests unless that person feels they will be helpful. Often, such a person is a surgeon.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi,
  I know this has nothing to do with breast cancer, but I come to this forum sometimes because I have had problems with breast lumps.
  My question has to do with echogenicity of nodules.  I have a thyroid nodule and I was told the opposite about the echogenicity and the liklihood of cancer by my radiologists who perform my thyroid ultrasounds.  I was always told that a hypoechoic area was more likely to be cancerous than a hyperechoic one.   Can you please respond to this because I'm a little worried now.  thank you so much.
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