Breast Cancer Expert Forum
DCIS grade 2
About This Forum:

Questions posted in the Breast Cancer Forum are answered by medical professionals and experts. Topics include Breast Biopsy, Chemotherapy, Hormone Therapy, Lumps, Lumpectomy, Lymph node dissection, Lymphedema, Mammograms, Mastectomy, Radiation Therapy, Reconstruction, Self Breast Exam, and Surgery.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

DCIS grade 2

I've just been diagnosed with DCIS grade 2 which is all that I know thus far. What is the usual treatment for this type of cancer?  Does this have a high cure rate? What are the chances of it being invasive?
Related Discussions
Avatar_n_tn
Dear Carol in Pittsburgh:  DCIS (ductal carcinoma) is a non invasive form of breast cancer that, theoretically, should not have the ability to spread elsewhere in the body.  DCIS has an excellent prognosis when treated surgically with either mastectomy or breast conserving surgery (lumpectomy) which is usually followed by radiation therapy.  If left untreated, however, DCIS could develop into an invasive cancer.  In addition, DCIS can be associated with an invasive cancer which would likely alter the treatment recommendations.  For pure DCIS, there is no need for chemotherapy.  For DCIS that is estrogen receptor positive, tamoxifen is frequently recommended following breast conserving surgery and radiation to further reduce the risk of local recurrence and to reduce the risk of a new cancer on the other side.
3 Comments
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
DCIS, by defintion, is not invasive. It should have nearly 100% cure rate (it's true that without being able to slice the samples so thin as to be able to see every single cell, it's possible to miss a tiny area of invasion. But the "IS" of DCIS stands for in-situ, which means it has not crossed a certain barrier and therefore is non-invasive and can't spread beyond the breast. It can, however, spread within the ducts of the breast. Treatment aims to get rid of all the tissues at risk for intraductal spread. The decisions are based on several details of the DCIS a person has: it can be very tiny, and, depending on age, may require only a small area of excision with no more treatment except, in some cases, taking hormone-blocking medication. In other situations it requires lumpectomy and radiation. If it's extensive enough, simple mastectomy is done. Hormone blockers are usually used, no matter what direct treatment the breast gets. It also depends on specifics of how it looks under the microscope: is there enough within a duct that the duct is expanded outward; are the cells in the center of the DCIS dying? Grade 2, in and of itself, is not enough info on which to say for sure what's best. The good news is that with treatment, cure is nearly guaranteed.
Blank
Avatar_n_tn
DCIS grade 2 confused.

Now I'm really confused.  Will I have to have my breast removed with DCIS even if it shows signs of invasive cancer?   Would the mammogram or biopsy have shown that was the case?

If DCIS is slow growing limited to the ducts, what is the likelihood especially given that I've had yearly mammograms that never showed any evidence of micro calcifications that this would be invasive?  I do not have a history of any cancer in my family. If it were invasive, is it likely that I could do the lumpectomy w/radiation? I am so afraid of having my breast removed and chemotherapy. What is the likelihood of this?

I meet with my breast surgeon next Monday...I've been trying to gather all the info that I can until that time. I've been really scared by all of this.

Thank you for your time.

Carol

Blank
Continue discussion Blank
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank