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atypical lobular hyperplasia
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atypical lobular hyperplasia

im 53 years old. I have had a core boiopsy and then surgery.
The said it was not cancer but it was  atypical lobular hyperplasia.
My dr. suggested Tamoxiten.
Im not sure if I should go on this drug yet since I do not have cancer?
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,

Atypical lobular hyperplasia has hih chances of developing into cancer in the future.

Tamoxifen is known to decrease the risk of developing cancer in the future in patients with Atypical lobular hyperplasia.

Talk to your oncologist in detail about this and clear out any doubts that you have.

It would be best to follow the management plan as advised by your specialist.

Let us know if you have any more doubts.

Regards.
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Avatar_f_tn
I was just given results for my biopsy and was told i will need surgery to remove the area. I believe I have ALH. On the american cancer page it says my risk of developing breast cancer in the next 15 years is 20-25%.

Isn't surgery at this point a bit drastic? Both the american cancer site and another doctor on another post here seem to suggest more intensive monitoring, with mammogramms and possible MRI, but not surgery at this satge.

This is the complete pathology report:

Calcifications in bening lobules
Focal Vascular Calcifications
Enlarged lobules with columnar alteration and focal cytologic atypia
Focal atypical Lobular Hyperplasia
Focal Apocrine Metaplasia and Duct Ectasia

I would really appreciate some input from a doctor...





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Avatar_f_tn
I think the underline part of that report would be the atypical hyperplasia.
I had a lumpectomy to remove those abnormal cells, which I was told is one stage or step from cancer cells, so I think it would be prudent to have it removed before it turns into cancer.
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Avatar_f_tn
Atypical hyperplasia is a condition where breast cells are abnormal in number, size, shape, appearance and growth pattern. Location of the abnormal cells within the breast tissue — the lobules or the milk ducts — determines whether the cells are atypical lobular hyperplasia or atypical ductal hyperplasia.

Breast cancer is characterized by the overgrowth of abnormal cells, a multistep process called carcinogenesis. The process begins when normal cell development and growth become disrupted, causing an overproduction of normal-looking cells (hyperplasia). Atypical hyperplasia occurs when the excess cells stack upon one another and begin to take on an abnormal appearance. The abnormal cells can continue to change in appearance and multiply, evolving into noninvasive (in situ) cancer, in which cancer cells remain confined to the area where they start growing. Left untreated, the cancer cells may eventually become invasive cancer, invading surrounding tissue, blood vessels or lymph channels.

Researchers aren't sure exactly what causes the progression from normal cells to hyperplasia to atypical hyperplasia to in situ and invasive cancer.

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Avatar_n_tn
This is very informative.  Thanks.
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