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Centers for Independant Living (CIL'S)
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Centers for Independant Living (CIL'S)

An alternative to a nursing home can be a CIL facility. Many people have never heard of them. They are independent non-profits sometimes, but not always affiliated with nursing homes. Some units are in apartment buildings, but others are in small housing developments. One advantage is that a husband and wife can often live together, which is not always the case with a nursing home. Generally there are geographical "catchment areas" for each facility. They are funded in the United States for HUD.

I arranged for my mother to enter such an environment years ago. Her apartment was part of  complex erected in 1973. There were one hundred plus wheelchair accessible apartments, set up in a beautiful park with flower gardens, a senior center providing breakfast and lunch, and twenty hours a week of in-person care services. Right next door was a very nice nursing home, for residents to move to if they became too disabled to live in the apartments. The apartments consisted of a full kitchen, large bedroom, large living room, and air-conditioning. They were in small brick aesthetic buildings, each building with four apartments and an allocated parking space. Rent was twenty-five percent of the elderly patient's income. In each apartment were three emergency call chains, that when pulled would summon a nurse from the nearby nursing home. There were monthly visits by a nurse, and a recreation center.

These facilities often have a long waiting list. From two to five years. They don't advertise on the net.

You can locate them by contacting your local community board, or social worker in a nearby senior center. Otherwise do a search under HUD on the internet.

One big advantage is that you don't have to sign over your life-savings, which is often the case with a nursing home. And you can come and go as you please.
4 Comments Post a Comment
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3112530_tn?1342559764
I had an Aunt and Uncle that lived in one of these facilities and my Aunt would call me and say the place was weird. She explained that people stay behind their closed doors and you rarely see them. I think my Aunt expected more but overall she was happy with the facility.
Now that I am coming of age, I would like to know more about the financial responsibility of a CIL facility. I may consider going to one.
Is there an age requirement? I live with a caregiver. What are the responsibility with that situation?
Appreciate any information.
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144586_tn?1284669764
That is a very good question. These facilities vary greatly in terms of their ambience, quality of life and amenities. One I know of is in a converted hotel and they have excellent meals, a social worker that meets weekly in a group setting, sing-alongs twice a week, and an in-house nurse. The age requirement is over fifty-five. There are interviews and both a psychiatric clearance and a mobility clearance. The specific entry requirements are on the HUD site and established a bit differently for each facility. Some of them are intrusive in terms of room inspections, which is annoying, and do not permit extended absences. Others, basically "mind their own business". One problem is the general requirement that the applicant live in the facility "catchment area". There are exceptions to this rule.
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3112530_tn?1342559764
I was considering visiting one but don't want to advertise that I am considering their facility. What is the best way to go about this? I would like to walk in unannounced. Is that a problem?
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144586_tn?1284669764
That is a good question. In my experience the people that run these facilities are paranoid. The best thing to do is to be visiting a resident and to ask their opinion. Residents are permitted to have guests for lunch or breakfast. In my area most are co-located with senior centers. You don't need anything other than to be sixty to visit and eat at a senior center. Usually they have a security guard denying access to the living floors unless accompanied by a resident. At lunch there you will surely find lots of people to offer their opinion. One big probem is now U.S. hospitals cannot discharge patients to homelessness. Thus, a large number of people with psychiatric issues have ended up in these facilities.
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