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Son's Celiac Bloodwork...
Recently we were referred to a pediatric endocrinologist after my son's growth hormones were measured low through his pediatrician. The endocrinologist decided to run a celiac panel and my son's Tissue Transglutaminase IGA came back at 128! The doctor's office said normal would be below 6.9 and that his celiac test was "very strongly positive". Has anyone had this experience? His only symptoms I would say are some constipation issues and sometimes he has a hard time controlling his emotions. He was sick a lot last year (which led us to the doctor in the first place), but some of that may have been due to school anxiety. My son is 13. He definitely has short stature, which is also why some of the tests were run. My husband is 5'10" and I am 5'4", and we were both late bloomers, so this never really raised any bells for us. But his rate of growth is definitely low.

The endocrinologist referred us to a pediatric GI. Any thoughts or advice? Do the blood tests mean he definitely has celiac, or there other tests to run. We are new to all of this!!
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Avatar_universal
Celiac can be a cause of anxiety because the body is not getting enough nutrients. I am guess the g.i. will want to do an upper endoscopy to see just how much damage has been done to the small intestine. Also be sure to ask the g.i. (if the doc does not order them) for blood test for iron and feritin levels, B12, and vit D because many people w/celiacs are deficient in these nutrients.

Good luck,
achilles2
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Thank you so much for your response! I will definitely make sure to ask for the bloodwork you suggested. I appreciate your insight.
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