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91/2 year old with unusual fear
I have a 91/2 year old boy. He has Aspergers. He has a big and unusual fear of a leap frog toy that he loved as a toddler He is afraid of it when it shuts off automatically and says" Bye for now". He doesn't talk about it but whenever I bring it up, he tenses up and covers his ears tightly. Last March his baby sister started playing with it turned on in her crib and it could be heard on the monitor. If he heard it on the monitor, he screamed and sometimes cried. At the end of last March it was time for him to face his fear, but he just cried the whole time and didn't even turn it on. After that I put it up high in the basement which seemed to lessen the anxiety a great deal but he is still very afraid of it. Please help me!
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377600 tn?1225167036
I would just throw the toy away.  A lot of even non-Asperger's children develop strange phobias during childhood--even with familiar objects/places--like the shower.

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Please more replies. But I want replies that are long and have good advice. Also, please read through my post carefully.
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I agree with the first reply - just throw the toy away (and my reply is even shorter).
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13167 tn?1327197724
gfever,  if he develops a phobia of something important,  deal with that.  For example if he becomes terrified of dogs,  or bath drains,  or things you run into in your daily life,  that needs to be dealt with.

This kind of seems silly.  Throw the stupid thing away.  Better yet,  allow him to decide how to destroy it for good and ever.
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