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OK. Im 15 and I may have thyriod. how do I know?
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OK. Im 15 and I may have thyriod. how do I know?

  Hello My name is Tiffany. I think I may have thyroid.So does my mom. My mom, like two of my aunts, and my grandma have it. My mother is taking me to that doctore to check it out. But if I have it I would like to know alot about it. If i do have it I dont know which one. My symtoms (symptoms) are: I spas out, hypervenalate, I eat and eat but I dont gain, I cant sleep... ect.....
  PLEASE HELP. I want to know about thyroid but I cant understand this stuff.
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Dear Tiffany,
Your mom is doing the right thing by having you seea doctor, not only because of your symptoms (regardless of what is causing them), but also because of the family history of thyroid problems. When you say you "have thyroid", you probably are referring to two possibilities. The thyroid gland can produce too much of the hormones that help control the way the body uses energy. This condition is caled HYPERTHYROIDISM, and it causes the body's chemical processes (metabolism) to speed up (such as might be indicated by some of the symptoms you listed). Some of the more common symptoms include weight loss, tiredness, extreme discomfort in warm temperatures, excessive sweating, heart flutters, hair loss, tremors and nervousness. The thyroid gland can also produce too little of the hormones needed to regulate the way the body uses energy. This condition is called HYPOTHYROIDISM. This condition causes slowing of the body's chemical processes. Some of the common symptoms are weakness, fatigue, depression, memory problems, constipation, dry skin, inability to tolerate cold temperatures. In children it can result in behavior changes and poor school performance, along with a slowing of physical and sexual development.
When you see your doctor, he/she will likely have some blood drawn in order to measure thyroid hormone levels. The most common blood tests related to diagnosis of hyperthyroidism include high-sensitivity thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) assays and Thyroxine (T4) measurement. The doctor may also want to do some other tests, such as T3 measurement, radioactive iodine uptake and thyroid scan. Such tests can rule out other conditions and can help to determine the cause of hyperthyroidism. Some of the same tests (e.g., TSH assay, T4 measurement, thyroid antibodies test) can help to determine hypothyroidism.
In any case, you're on the right track by going to the doctor. If hyperthyroidism is diagnosed, it can be treated with medication (anti-thyroid drugs), with radioactive iodine (I-131), or with surgery. Hypothyroidism is treated with man-made hormones (hormone replacement therapy).  
This information is provided for general medical education purposes only. Please consult your physician for diagnostic and treatment options pertaining to your particular medical condition or situation.
*Keyword: Thyroid




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