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Update on my five year old, doctor wants him eval. for Sensory Processi...
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Update on my five year old, doctor wants him eval. for Sensory Processing disorder

I finally got my son into the psychiatrist,  I told him everything that was going on with teh school and at home and everything that has happened to my son in the past year.  I told him the school thinks he has ADHD, etc.  The school had hinted at medications, he told me, let's put the teacher on medications. I had to laugh at that one!  He said he wasn't totally sure about the ADHD, but he did not want to start medications, he said they have too many side effects and it might help, but then even so we could not be sure it was ADHD.   He said we really need to get to the root of the behaviors, etc.  So now, he wants me to get him evaluated for sensory processing disorder.  I gave him a list of behaviors from the school that were written on his behavioral plan, so he saw everything.   So now, I need to try to find an occupational therapist to evaluate him for it.  
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Well, let me say that is almost GOOD news.  Sensory is what my boy has and through occupational therapy and effort at home, he is doing really well.  When you call occupational therapists, ask if they specialize in sensory issues.  I just can't tell you how thrilled we have been with our son's progress after diagnosis and ot.  Let me know if you would like any play ideas for at home to get started.  goodluck
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the pediatrician is supposed to call me back and get me an order to go see a occupational therapist.  The therapist also gave me a center to look at.  I just hope this is what he has.  I know they keep saying ADHD, but the psychiatrist said that can mimic ADHD.  He was being stubborn again with is teacher, he did not want to put his snack away. I told them sometimes he is definat and they said that is not uncommon with sensory issues.  Thanks Specialmom for telling me all about it, etc.  It helps.  How long did it take you to get results?
Do you think they can help themselves or are things they do involuntary. He does so much better 1 on 1 with me.
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First, with things like getting him to put his snack away-------  he will do much better with being given a choice.  Sensory kids need to feel a little control.  They are not getting their way as the teacher is giving the choices.  Do you want to put your snack away or whatever an alternative can be?  He'll choose and most likely follow through.

To be honest, we saw some results pretty quickly.  Now, a sensory kid can still have a bad day like everyone else.  But the thought is that they will have less bad days and more good ones.  My son has only had one bad day this year at school------  which is amazing.  The goal of therapy is to give the child first things that help calm that nervous system.  They all seem like play-------  they will work on that with you to and you will have to do sensory play every day (as much as possible).  This helps the nervous system work properly.  Some of the activies have a calming affect that lasts a day or two.  It is amazing.  The also help with behavioral strategies such as stress thermometer to help with meltdowns.  They give you language to use with him and can work with his teacher as well.  They will give him strategies to cope with the sensory things that are bothering him.  My son's engine (as we now call it) will start to go too high at school.  He has a list of things he can do to slow it back down.  The goal is for him to recognize it and do those things unprompted.  In the begining, you and his teacher will have to prompt him.

My son is in a regular classroom with no special services or intervention whatsover at this point.  Even last year, he had many issues in school.  Much less than the year before that.  So we have come a long way.  But I'm guessing you will see a response pretty quickly with occupational therapy (if you get a good one that specializes in sensory).  I like your psychiatrist a LOT.  He is exactly right-------  sensory and adhd can look very similar.  Some kids with adhd have sensory too--------  so time will tell with your son.  

Let me know if there is any way I can help.  good luck  
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I got some resources on OTs today and some places to call.  I just want things to improve and for him to be able to function better in a classroom setting.  It's discouraging to get "bad" news all the time.  The guy who did the intake said he is son actually escaped from teh school.  My son tried to escape from teh school about a month and a half ago.  

Thanks for your help.  
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Yes, flight or fight is a common response for sensory kids.  It is a base level reaction and means your son was feeling the worst of the worst that day.  You're off to a good start.  
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Around me, I don't see these behaviors, yes, he has his bad moments, but not like the school describes, it's really frustrating. He has been what I call somewhat of a perfectionist.   He likes things a "certain" way.  Will only wear "certain" clothes, soft, no tight waists, etc.  No jeans, no khakis.  I finally have gotten him okay again with socks, but that was hard, he does not like layered clothing.  Prefers short sleeves over long sleeves, etc.  

They are trying to slwoly integrate him back into a classroom.  When he sees his old class, he tries to hide or if he's in a room, he shuts the door so he does not have to face them.  sometimes he hides under desks, etc.
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Ah, yes . . .  my son can be the same way.  The inflexibility is part of his trying to cope with his sensory issues.  He is going to feel so much better after occupational therapy starts!  I can't wait for that to happen------  I think you will be very happy.  Things won't get perfect, but they may get so much better.  goodluck
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Sometimes he is still having a hard time doing tasks, but it's better than it was.  If something is hard for him, he tries to avoid it.  HE has a low frustration threshold, does your son have that at times?  My son is very inconsistent,some days are good, while others are more rough.
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Please remember that even though your son is very young, it is very normal to avoid something that is very difficult to do or to deal with.  As we age, it becomes easier to deal with defeat (to a certain extent).  Your son needs to experience successes.  It will take a lot of small steps.  But with each little step, his confidence will grow.
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Thank you for telling me that Sandman2.  and also Specialmom thanks for your input too.  It helps so much. I'm glad I found this forum.  The school doesn't awlays seem encouraging.  Thanks for reminding me what is normal.
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You are welcome.  By the way, (I may have missed it in an earlier post) did your son ever get moved out of the teachers class that he started the year in?
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They are slowly integrating him back into a classroom, another teacher's classroom.  I hope things will improve.
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i get a call today that he does not want to put his snack away and started to run away and hide under the stairwell.  I talked to the learning spec. I am feeling like she is disappointed with the doctor's appt and outcome. She says I wish I could have talked to him beforeharnd, but I work in the medical field and you ahve to have the patient permission to talk to someone first and usually the doctor wants to see the pateint first to have a baseline before he talks with others.   Is this a usual reaction from a school?  I just don't know really what else to do anymore.   I am working on getting him into an OT to be evaluated.  Will things ever get better?  They say he has no attention span at school and cannot focus on anything, but that's not always true. He's inconsistent somedays focusing better than others.  Thanks for any and all input.  I am just feeling really discouraged now.
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She also said she would not spend any more time going to doctors to evaluate for sensory disorders because she knows a lot about those and they are using some sensory techniques. I told her they want me to see an OT and not a doctor.  My hands are tied.  
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Let me just say that I do not know if your son has sensory integration disorder or not, obviously.  But you have a doctor suggesting so.  You may go on a short waiting list for your occupational therapist  evaluation, but you need to get on that list asap.  You can go on a couple of different waiting lists and go to whoever pops up first.  I had been told it would be a 4 month wait and it was less than one month.  

You are the advocate for you child.  You hold strong to what you believe.  I would do yourself a big favor and get every thing you can on sensory to read.  Once your son is in ot, they will have lots of books you can borrow but until then, invest in a few.  The out of sync child is good and the outof sync child has fun is good as an activity book.  Both are by Carol Kranowitz.  They will give you ideas for what to do to help him.  Give him a thick piece of gum on the way to school.  Have him do animal walks, crash into pillows and then give him some deep pressure.  All will help regulate him for his day at school.  At school, have the teacher give him some "heavy work" to do before he is to sit to do something.  Erase chalk or dry erase bourds, have him carry some books across the room for her, move some chairs.  Have all the kids get up and give themselves a big bear hug, high five each other, do a wall push up.  These things are easily put in a day that help a child stay focased.  Visual timers work well.  (those clocks with the red that shows how much time is left------  you have until the red is all gone and then you need to put snack away.)  etc.  Seriously, simple things and small concessions can make the difference between a good and bad day for a sensory kid.  

Does the school have an occupational therapist?  I'd contact them and see what they think and what kinds of exercises they could do with him.  Our school has a sensory room and the schools here that don't, the ot has a traveling gym that she brings.  

Good luck.  Others judgement or disappointment is not worth getting upset about.  You are trying to figure it out and are doing everything in your power to do so.  Good luck and hang in there.  It can be frustrating.  But stay strong.  
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I made an appt for an eval, it's not until April 20th, wish it were sooner, but apparently wait lists are LONG for this kind of eval.   Maybe I should suggest them having him do heavy work and not having him sit first thing. He loves to move chairs and do heavy work, pushing, pulling, etc.  He's a hard worker. I just feel that hte learning spec. is upset with me and I wonder too if she wanted to talk with teh doctor to influence his decision.  I just don't know anymore, it's just hard to be the parent and hear all the negative.  

Yes, the school does have an OT and they have gotten ideas from her nad they have helped.

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