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aspergers?
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aspergers?

how do i know if my son has this disorder??? in a family practice i worked at a couple of years ago we had a patient with it and i thought my son had some similarities. he has been diagnosed with ADHD and ODD. hes on meds and does pretty well. he is at or above grade level in school. my concerns are his social interactions with others..i have noticed more and more that he does not give eye contact while talking unless asked for. he does not notice personal space. ive noticed in public he will stand really close to people in line. i know something else is going on with my child but im not sure what. we recently move to florida so i am getting him plugged in to  mental health professionals. he cries in my opinion more than a normal 8 year old boy should. i have to constanly repeat myself about daily activities. hes not very cautious about looking for dangers while riding his bike in the parking lot. he is a little clumsy. he plays soccer but gets very angry if he doesnt score a goal or runs fast enough. if he falls he just lays there and cries. sometimes he makes weird noises that make no sense. if he has even a small amount of sugar he acts up. im not sure how much of this is normal. any ideas or opinions will help.. thank you
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Hi, what you describe are things I would describe with my son as well.  Exactly as my son.  My dear boy was diagnosed with sensory integration disorder.  This involves the nervous system and how the brain processes things.  My boy will stand too close to someone because he doesnt process it that way.  He doesn't "feel" where he is at.  He bangs into walls, people, things because his nervous system sends the impulse for him to do so so that his brain will "feel" where he is at in space.  My son is a sensory seeker, he's never met a "thrill ride" he was afraid of.  Why?  His nervous system is begging for input.  He'll jump off of things, ride his bike into things, play hard and intensely all for this reason.  His social skills did not come naturally-----------  he too will avoid eye contact at times and missses many social cues.  He's had his share of troubles with friends and adults.  He'll also speak too loudly, be quite blunt, etc.  He was "clumsy" while being quite athletic at the same time.  The first two things that were said to me as it was being determined that we needed to investigate what was going on with him is that he "trips a lot and has articulation problems at times with speech".  Both worse at school than at home.  My son has been quite volatile at times---------  gets upset about things that other kids seem to blow off or let roll off their backs and once upset, has trouble calming down.  This is part of regulation/modulation.   Making noises, also often a sensory thing-------------  as it was asked of me about 5 times on his initial evaluation.  

So,  I had my beautiful boy evalutated by an occupational therapist which is the specialty that diagnoses and treats sensory integration disorder.  Google sensory integration disorder and see what you think.  From your description above----------- our kids are the same person.  I so suggest that you look into this and probably more than any other post I've ever read here at med help (and I've read a lot).  Treatment for sensory integration disorder is occupational therapy as I've said and EVERY kid should be lucky enough to go to occupational therapy.  It is a combination of play therapy that works on the nervous system directly (and a sensory seeker as I am guessing your son is-------  benefits more than I can tell you from these activities), behavioral techniques, and specific skills that are unique to a child that is being treated (my son needed help with hand writing, for example.).  While in OT, you get lists of things to do at home----------- and then every day you do these things which makes a child much better regulated and have less of the things you listed throughout their day.  For example, if my son has been to a park and he runs, jumps, rolls down a hill and then runs back up it, kicks a soccer ball, swings, hangs off monkey bars---------- and does this for a big chunk of time . . . he is MUCH calmer for a period of time, even into the next day or two.  So you will have activites to encourage your child to do to help calm his nervous system, feel any sensory impulse that he is seeking in safe ways, etc.  I have about . . . oh, 10,000 games and ideas of things to do at home that have made a world of difference in my son so let me know if you'd like more ideas.

For the social things like standing too close,  etc. -----------  you can play games to help him.  For example, standing too close.  Get a  hoola hoop.  Have him put it around him.  Then . . .try to get in with him.  He'll laugh and pull back.  No room!  This show him a living example of personal space.  Then you can tell him to not get closer than your/and their hoola hoop allows.  There are tricks and ways of handling all of what you've described.

I so recommend you read about sensory integration disorder and let me know what you think.  By the way, adhd and sensory can look very similar.  Often sensory integration disorder is confused as adhd and since medication doesn't work for sensory, it is good to know which is which.  Some kids with adhd also have comorbid sensory as well though.  But, I do not hear aspergers in what you write.  I hear sensory!  (have I made my point?  LOL)  

My son was officially diagnosed at 4 and is now 7. He is doing fantastic.  He is well regulated and we have vere few problems at this point.  He has to work harder than other kids on things but he does well in school, has friends, and functions quite well.  Google it and let me know what you think!
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