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learning disabilities
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learning disabilities

if your child had learning disabiliies would you put him in a regular classroom?


This discussion is related to Help for my 12 year old son.
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As long as the extra help was there for the disabilities then yes i would as long as my child was also happy with it
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absolutely not,if your child has learning difficulties in any way shape or form then extra help is needed for them to acheive their full potential, there is nothing wrong with regular tuition for children but if your child needs more then seek to find more for them. regular classrooms i dont think are the answer..i dont this day and age
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1227139_tn?1367231533
Dear Noone13,

I am very sorry to get to your message so late after it was posted.
I completely advise all inclusive classrooms for any child with special needs.  I have attended forums and conferences which speak specifically to the benefits of having a child who has any type of special needs in an all inclusive classroom.  While often it can be beneficial for a special education setting, the reality is, lowered standards are often acceptable in these settings.  The special attention that is received does not replace the higher expectations for or of a child in those special education classes.  Now, having said that, depending on how much of a delay or special education is required might make that decision for you.  In most places today, regular classrooms (integrated) have people within the school system there to assist for the development and learning of any child with extra or special needs.  Also, depending on the type of special need, there are advocates who specialize in attending within the school system to ensure that your child's needs are met within the inclusive classroom setting.  I hate to disagree with any member about their comments, arguably in today's day and age is the reason why there are all inclusive classroom settings, and the results over studies all around the world in the last 10 years show that those who attended regular classrooms in regular schools did better academically and socially after school years compared to those who were taught in special education classes or schools.  There is a lot of proof behind the studies and why all inclusive or regular classrooms are better.  This is not just an opinion (mine or other) but is actual fact.  It is also why parents have struggled so hard to get inclusiveness into the regular classroom.  I suggest it not only for the benefit of your child, but because so much work and study has gone into why it is better academically.  The short reason of why is explained this way.  If you pointed to 1 child in a classroom at the beginning of the school year and said, this child will be at the top of the class the study proved that this child would actually be.  The reason is due to the named expectation.  The same applies on a larger scale.  Also, what was discovered in special ed classes and schools were, the resources (whether it was with books, supplies or actual teacher's education of the studies rather then on the focus of the special needs environment etc) all around were less and therefore as a result, children had less.  In regular settings, they had more resources as a whole (in all of education) and therefore by result effectively had more.  I could go on for ever giving the actual reasons but clearly the studies showed the benefits were staggeringly higher.

Please message me directly if you wish to have some more information on this topic.  At our last conference, I received an entire booklet summation on this very topic.  I am the Community Leader for Down syndrome and Special Needs Forums here and I also run groups specifically for Down sydnrome as my son has Down syndrome.

In addition to anything I have mentioned, please keep in mind, that while I or others may have extensive knowledge in many areas, you should always seek professional medical advice from your own physician, as it pertains to medical conditions or concerns.

Good luck, and if you have any other questions that I can help you with, please feel free to message me directly.

Sincerely,
Sandi (Dragon1973)
MedHelp Genetics Community Leader;
Children - Special Needs Community Leader;
Down syndrome Community Leader & Ds Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
MTHFR Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
Pregnancy: June 2011 Community Leader
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1227139_tn?1367231533
Hello Noone13,

I found the research links that speak specifically to inclusive education.  Now, although you may find that some of these are specific to Down syndrome, the basis of theory is the same.  I figured you might want to view some of these.  I haven't personally gone through them all, but this was a topic on one of my other support boards and it just happened to ironically be discussed today and I thought of your post.

Here are the many links regarding the studies and information on inclusion.  My hope is that you can see from a non-biased perspective (rather then our own opinions) on how beneficial it is for your child.  Please let me know what you think after seeing these.

http://www.downsed.org/en/gb/inclusion-support/

http://shop.downsed.com/dvd/inclusion-practice-educating-children-down-syndrome-primary-school-pal-dvd-r

http://www.uni.edu/inclusion/research.htm

http://www.down-syndrome.org/practice/149/

http://www.ndss.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=242:positive-steps-for-social-inclusion&catid=75:recreation-a-friendship

http://www.njcie.net/pdf/resources/research-on-inclusive-education.pdf

Here are some books on the topic as well:
http://www.amazon.com/Inclusion-Strategies-Practical-Educators-Disabilities/dp/1890455253/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1295636027&sr=1-2

http://www.amazon.com/Paraprofessionals-Handbook-Effective-Inclusive-Classrooms/dp/155766899X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1295636211&sr=1-1

And also some training information for education teams:
http://soeweb.syr.edu/centers_institutes/institute_communication_inclusion/default.aspx

I hope that this helps you to make an informed decision.  And again, if you have any questions at all, please don't hesitate to message me directly!

In addition to anything I have mentioned, please keep in mind, that while I or others may have extensive knowledge in many areas, you should always seek professional medical advice from your own physician, as it pertains to medical conditions or concerns.

Good luck, and if you have any other questions that I can help you with, please feel free to message me directly.

Sincerely,
Sandi (Dragon1973)
MedHelp Genetics Community Leader;
Children - Special Needs Community Leader;
Down syndrome Community Leader & Ds Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
MTHFR Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
Pregnancy: June 2011 Community Leader
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hi noone i noticed you havent replied,i cant say im suprised as reading through your posts you seem to have been overcome and overwhelmed with to much information.
my daughter has a rare genetic syndrome,she is 16 now an goes to a main stream college which she found hard to begin with when she started september gone because of bullyin and people finding her to be different.she is overcoming that now and its what makes her stronger.while she was in school she was in special education and she thrived..ye know why? because she didnt have the everyday task of tryin to fit in,she went to school to learn,it was me as a parent that made sure she found her way in the world,.and she is doin fine now goin into life to be able to deal with what life has to offer,.with all due respect to so called experts.they havent got a clue. because the help is out there,you know your child better than anyone an you just do your best..read books till your blue in the face but you do whats best for  your child with appropriate help on the way and listen to your heart. experts arent always right.why they are called experts i dont know,but best of luck to you and your family
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1227139_tn?1367231533
Aside from statistics or experts, I agree with Marialou that there are different advantages to special education, just as there are disadvantages.  No one will be able to judge better then you on what you would like out of where your child is educated.  Every child (whether delayed or not) may have the issues of fitting in, socializing or in general having difficulties with education.  In inclusive classroom settings these very situations happen to children who do not have any added difficulties such as delays.  I do not purport to be an expert myself, just a person who has seen both sides of the systems here in Canada and one who has read other studies on the topic.  I can explain from my own personal dealings (which I did not include before) I also have a step daughter with a serious intellectual delay who is schooled in the "Special Education School system" and her two siblings that are not, but do have minor delays.  What I can tell you from a personal perspective/opinion is that she is learning but could probably get a better education from an inclusive classroom setting, despite the other issues that she has to face such as bullying (which does happen everywhere) and difficulties with the education material.  I think, when it comes down to it, for me regarding her, if I and my husband could choose (which unfortunately we cannot since we don't have full custody of her) it would be to get her the best education which would mean putting her into an inclusive setting, so that she wasn't segregated (as she feels now compared to her peers, friends and siblings) and find other ways to deal with the side effects such as the bullying etc.  For us, I'd personally like her to get the best education she could get as far as resources and expectations go, rather then just settle for education (in our area) that is only half as great, and deal with the other side issues that perhaps special education may somewhat solve.  Remaining in special ed could potentially cause her issues later, since she has been in the Special Ed system and once out of it, may find it difficult to acclimate/adjust to a regular secondary (and post) system perhaps as Marilou mentioned her daughter did since my Step daughter wont know how to deal with those types of issues, never having faced them before.  Regardless, I respect everything that the above poster has said, and I do think that every area is different, education, socially and all.

Another thing to consider is, If the regular school systems do not have advocates (or education assistants) within the system, then it may not be the place to have your child go.  Also, if social issues exist such as bullying or other problems that can not be solved to help your child then definitely a special education system might be beneficial.

The goal here is to provide who ever is also looking at this information (not just the original person who posted it) to give a rounded answer of all sides by all people who have/post answers.  For me, it's important to post the benefits of what I have discovered and believed to be more beneficial for a situation that might mirror my own, and that means providing the details that explain it.  (Including the statistics and reports that show what I have learned.)
I am also the first to say, experts aren't always right, (I am medical living proof) but aside from that, I hope that you have gained knowledge or at least some insight, as well as anyone else who reads this thread.  

In addition to anything I have mentioned, please keep in mind, that while I or others may have extensive knowledge in many areas, you should always seek professional medical advice from your own physician, as it pertains to medical conditions or concerns.

Good luck, and if you have any other questions that I can help you with, please feel free to message me directly.

Sincerely,
Sandi (Dragon1973)
MedHelp Genetics Community Leader;
Children - Special Needs Community Leader;
Down syndrome Community Leader & Ds Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
MTHFR Group Forum Founder/Moderator;
Pregnancy: June 2011 Community Leader
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This forum is extremely helpful as I am a special needs course student and learning so much in taking care of children with LD.
thanks
Rahm.
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My son is special needs and is in an inclusive program.  We used to live in another state and the school district didn't offer much.  Had we stayed, I truly believe they would have damaged our chances of being mainstreamed.  My son is now in fourth grade.  He is doing wonderfully and is closing the gap.  This is not to say things have been peaches and cream (he is special), but he is learning more, doing more, involved more.  If you can have your child in an inclusive program, do it but make sure he/she has the proper support.  Also, not all programs are equal.  We went to one school that was outstanding to another one (within the same district) that is just exceptional.  I wish you lots of luck.
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Hi!

My little sister has learning disabilities, and she's in a regular classroom. However, there are aids in her classroom and around the school. She is also allowed to go to the Special Education classroom if she's having a "bad day".

I've noticed she does much better in a normal classroom with the other kids. She isn't as insecure about being teased, and she gets to be around her friends and her twin sister. She also just likes the whole classroom in general. It's not to say she doesn't love Special Ed---she really does love that classroom, too, because she gets to work on a laptop while sitting on a pilate's ball (to keep her focused)

What I would say is to make sure your son has good resources available for what his needs are. Does he need a computer like my sister (she can't write)? Is a special ed room available for him if he would need it? Could he have an aid pop in to the room? Also, as he's 12, I would guess he's in middle school. So then you have to ask, does his school switch classes? Can he handle those switches?

See if he can, to start off with, put him in "part time" main classrooms. That's what we did with Shannon. Half the day, the child in the special education room, or at least one-on-one with a special ed teacher. The other half, they're in the regular classroom. Then you slowly introduce it.

Again, I don't know your son's disabilities, so it's hard to say exactly what you should do. But this plan worked well for Shannon, so I thought I would give my suggestion.
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