Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Expert Forum
To take medication or not?
About This Forum:

This forum is for questions and support regarding COPD, coughing/wheezing, chronic bronchitis, emphysema, lung infections, pollution, smoking, treatment for COPD and what causes COPD.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

To take medication or not?

My pulmo changed my COPD rating from moderate to mild with my latest test results. I did not find this out until I called and left a message yesterday to speak to the nurse about thrush issues. I told her while I had her on the phone I had a question about what the doctor had put down after my last test results. She said he had put down that due to the recent test ran that he was changing my diagnosis to mild copd. He also stated in his notes that the new results were in part from my recovery from pnuemonia (pneumonia) and length of time from pneumonia, cessation of smoking and improved health habits.
My question is concerning my medication. Do the benefits of the medication with my new diagnosis outweight the side affects that this medicine could cause?  I have no plans to take up smoking again and plan on protecting my lungs still as much as possible.  I really need another doctors opinion on this?
242587_tn?1355427710
It is appropriate to specify the severity of COPD, only when an individual is in what we call a stable state;  that is, not still recovering from pneumonia, acute bronchitis or for that matter, any other serious disease including most notably, heart disease.  Your spirits should be raised by the news that your COPD is Mild, not Moderate or Severe.

And yes, depending on the results of your most recent PFT’s and your functional capacity, including exercise capacity, it may be possible or even advantageous to reconsider the need and dosing of your medications.  Oral thrush is a side effect of inhaled steroid medication, often eliminated or mitigated by faithful mouth rinsing after use and/or a reduction in the strength of the preparation used.  Higher doses, than necessary to get optimum benefit, are not infrequently prescribed on the basis of the belief that more is better.   Thrush s not serious but can be a real annoyance.  You ask, do the benefits of the medication outweigh the side effects?  That is a question that should be answered following mutual consideration of benefit and side effects, by you and your doctor.  Your doctor may agree to lower the dose or discontinue the drug.

As the American Lung Association would state:  “With smoking cessation you have committed a death-defying act.”  Never resume smoking.

Good luck
Blank
This Forum's Experts
242587_tn?1355427710
David Tinkelman, M.D.Blank
National Jewish Health
Denver, CO
Blank
Request an Appointment
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Asthma Tracker
Asthma Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
233488_tn?1310696703
Blank
New Cannabis Article from NORTH Mag...
Jul 20 by John C Hagan III, MD, FACS, FAAOBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
3 Reasons Why You are Still Binge E...
Jul 14 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Emotional Eating: What Your Closet ...
Jul 09 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank