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Tachycardia
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Tachycardia

I'm a former soldier, long distance runner and a physical fitness nut. Over four months ago, during extreme cold weather,  while using the elipitical machine in the gym, my HR went to 240 BPM.   This wa sthe first incident ever, of my HR suddenly going up.  I was taken to the local hospital emergency room, given electrical shock and within seconds I felt okay.  After being seen by a Cardiologist I was told I have supraventricular Tachycardia.  During a treadmill test my HR wouldn' go beyond 137 BPM.  Today  my EKG showed I have sinus-Bradycardia with sinus-arrhythmia.    The EKG showed a HR of 49 BPM.  Doctors told me my HR might suddenly go up at any second, or never suddenly go up again.  I decided to keep doing an hour of cardio exercise everyday.  Doctors at a University hospital, told me I should get a defib-plus put in my left chest just to make sure I'd be okay.  I refused to have the defib-plus implanted in my chest because I feel great and my HR has been staying at 107 BPM during the hour I do on the eliptical machine.   My resitng HR has always been between 50 and 60 BPM.  Does anyone have any advice that might help me?  I've also noticed that most web-sites on the subject of bradycardia and arrhythmia, give different opinions about the danger of this diagnosis.   To me this is really confusing because the EKG says I have sinus-bradycardia with sinus-arrhythmia  and the doctors I've seen tell me I have tachycardia.   The web-sites claim Tachycaredia is a fast heartbeat over 100 BPM, which I don't have.  I read the Pauling report and decided to take Vitamin c and L-Lysine.  I'd appreciate any suggestion anyone might have on this matter.
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144586_tn?1284669764
You have a complicated situation, impossible to diagnose over the internet. The cardioversion was probably appropriate, however it occasionally damages the pacemaker sites. The initial incident could have been caused by caused by something as simple as magnesium deficiency.

My suggestion is to get a second opinion from a cardiologist affiliated with another teaching hospital.
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144586_tn?1284669764
You have a complicated situation, impossible to diagnose over the internet. The cardioversion was probably appropriate, however it occasionally damages the pacemaker sites. The initial incident could have been caused by caused by something as simple as magnesium deficiency.

My suggestion is to get a second opinion from a cardiologist affiliated with another teaching hospital.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,
     Sinus bradycardia with tachycardia occasionally can be related to arrhythmias. Bradycardia with your history of being an athlete, doing regular exercise is very common and there is nothing to worry about it. But tachycardia which you experienced and got evaluated for was not related to exertion and is related to arrhythmia. It is important for you to get 24 hour monitoring of cardiac rhythm, to check for any rhythm abnormalities contributing to tachycardia. Also, it is important to correct these arrhythmia’s even though they are less frequent, because of their potential to become life threatening. If arrhythmia is been found you can use anti arrhythmic drugs or a pacemaker implantation. I would recommend that you get a second opinion on this by a cardiologist. Best.
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Avatar_n_tn
Thank you...  I appreciate your comments regarding my sudden increase in HR.  I will get an appointment with another hospital/Cardiologist to have a new evaluation.  I'm taking Magnesium and I feel better.  I read the Pauling Report and decided to take Vitamin C, and L-Lysine.  I've been taking L-Lysine and Vitamin C, for 3 weeks.  I take Vitamin C, twice daily and  L-Lysine twice daily.  Yesterday, my EKG showed Vent rate 49 BPM, "marked sinus bradycardia with sinus arrhythmia."   I've been doing the eliptical machine in the gym, for one hour everyday.  Occasionally, I can feel the delayed/skipped heart-beat.    I've been drinking water more-often as I work-out.  I noticed, that after eating Turkey Sausage, or pancakes, the arrhythmia, increases.   It's been over 4 months since my HR incidnet of where my HR suddenly went up.  I just dread getting a defib, or pacemaker.  Again, Thank you for your best response.
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear Caregiver:  I've read every article I can find on tachycardia.  Frankly speaking, I'm confused.  I'm told by University Hospital, I have supraventricular tachycardia, but my resting HR is 49 BPM.  All articles I've read, claim that tachycardia means a HR over 100 BPM.  Furthermore, some web-sites claim sinus-bradycardia and sinus-arrhythmia are related to each other and aren't dangerous.  Other sites claim the condiiton is dangerous.  what is correct? During the treadmill test my HR wouldn't go over 137 BPM.   When I worked out today, my HR stayed at 98 to 108 BPM.   The University Hospital done an MRI and as far as I know, they found nothing wrong.  My calcium score was 40. But for my age that appears to be a low calcium score.  To make things more confusing, The University hospital told me my HR might never suddenly go up again.  They then wanted to go inside my heart and try and make my HR increase in a clinical environment.  I couldn't see messing with something that could create a bigger problem.  The doctors I saw at  University Hospital were excelent doctors, but it appeared, everyone was stumped on what caused my problem.  My EKG last month, showed sinus-bradycardia with sinus tachycardia.  This month it showed sinus bradycardia with sinus arrhythmia.  I'm confused.
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Avatar_n_tn
Doctor Veena:  Thank you so much for your valuable information.  If you read my posts to Caregiver, you'll see I'm confused as to the diagnosis of Supraventricular tachycardia.   The EKG's are different too.  The Magnesium, or Vitamin C, W/L-Lsyine, seems to have cut down on the skipped heartbeats.  My heart was hesitating every 14 seconds and now it's hesitating after 45 seconds.  My heart will beat slowly 49-52  BPM  for 45 seconds and then it just stops for a second and kicks back in again.  I did notice that if I breathe normally while workimng out on the eliptical machine, my HR will stay between 98 to 108 BPM.  If I start talking with someone while I'm exercising on the eliptical machine,  my HR will go up over 125 BPM.  Is that normal?   If I notice my HR at 125 BPM and I begin to breathe in and out, my HR drops back to 98 BPM.  The truth is, I never watched my HR prior to the incident in December 2020, when my HR went to approx 239 BPM and I received the electrical shock.  
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Avatar_n_tn
Doctor Veena:  Sorry for the mis-spells.  The incident of sudden HR increase happened December 17, 2010... I mis-typed 2020.  Again, thenks for the input on this.  I will see another Cardiologist.
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,
     Heart rate around 125/min while you are working out is normal but not a heart rate of 240/min and this should be evaluated for the cause and treated to prevent untoward situations. You need to get 24 hour holter monitoring done to evaluate the frequency, source and cause for arrhythmia in your case if present. Treatment depends upon the cause. Do let us know about the progress of your case after consulting a cardiologist. Hope this helps. Best.
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