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Just a bit terrified
Hi all, how nice of everyone to care.

On Jan 15 I was taken via ambulance to the ER. I could not draw breath. I was in acute heart failure. It was a first for me.

I spent a week in the hospital. Since then I've had lots of tests but now I am going in for a heart cath on Tuesday. They say I have also had a heart attack and my extraction rate is 25.

I am encouraged by the good words about heart caths I have read here. My question is are stents that easy too? They say they will put them in during the heart cath if I need them.

Many thanks,
Pinky
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Avatar_universal
Ah yes, and I have a LBB and PVCs. They are planning a pacemaker and defibrillator in May.  Thanks-
Pinky
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It all depends on the blockage, such as the composition. For example, a total blockage of solid plaque may pose difficulties because the plaque has to be broken first to get the catheter wire through it. Once a large enough hole is made, then the catheter is removed, and a deflated balloon with a collapsed stent around it is passed up to the blockage, positioned so it lays across the hole. Then the balloon is inflated which expands the stent into place. Most blockages can be relatively easily stented. When the balloon is inflated, it stops blood flow through the artery and for about 20-30 seconds you feel some chest pain because this is basically simulating a heart attack.
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