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Help im worried sick.
Hello, i found out i was pregnant July 18, 2017. I had my very first ultrasound July 21,2017 and i was 6 wks 4 days. My EDD is March 12, 2018. My big worry here is that i am married and my husband and i were trying to have a baby. We always have unprotected sex but like everyone makes mistakes i made the big mistake of sleeping with a friend on June 5, 2017. We used a condom and it didn't break. Is there a possibility that my unborn child could be the friend i had protected sex with? I have very irregular periods. It jumps from months. Please someone help me out. I did the prenatal paternity testing but they haven't found fetal dna in my blood.
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134578 tn?1483549754
It sounds like you got pregnant around June 19 or 20. Sperm only lasts 5 or at most 6 days in your body, if any from the event on June 5 had escaped the condom, it would have died by June 19 or 20.  Did you test with Ravgen or the DDC? They suggest time frames before which you shouldn't bother to waste your money with prenatal testing.
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Hello thanks for your response. I tested with DDC. On August 28th i will be going to the lab for my 3rd blood draw.
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134578 tn?1483549754
Well, it will ease your worries, I'm sure. The dates should have also, since all of your data suggests June 19 or 20 for conception.
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I do have another question as to why i became so worried about the paternity of my child. On July 21, 2017 when the ultrasound read 6 wks 4 days i counted back in my calendar and it took me to the week of June 5-10th. Why is it different ? Im soo confused.
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134578 tn?1483549754
If a doctor, nurse, or any medical person says you're, for example, 8 weeks "pregnant", it is not a figure that counts back to conception but to two weeks before conception, to a computed first day of your last period.  All medical counts of pregnancy (the number like "6 weeks 5 days" or "11 weeks 2 days") begin on when an average woman with 28-day cycles would have had the first day of her last period before getting pregnant.  

The GA count (that's the "weeks" count) is done this way because, medically, the pregnancy time period begins on the first day of the woman's last period.  Especially in the days before ultrasounds, the last period was the only signal a woman had regarding when to start counting pregnancy. A period and its blood is noticeable.  Ovulation comes later and is hidden and date unknown.  So they would begin the pregnancy count with the first day of bleeding of the woman's last period she had before getting pregnant (even though the doctor knew the woman was not pregnant then -- she was having a period!)  And they still use this kind of count today, and to match it with all the medical databases, they compute it from the size of the embryo by going back two weeks to count back to an average first day of last period.

All medical textbooks, computer-generated counts, and language used by doctors and nurses use that count, and the woman's due date reflects it.  Modern technology now could help to pinpoint the conception date more accurately, but the pregnancy time period in all medical counts is still done this way.  

That is why pregnancy, which takes 38 weeks from conception to full term, is still counted as being 40 weeks long.  They add a spare two weeks at the front, to be able to calibrate the count to  all populations of women. When a doctor the world over says "11 weeks pregnant," he means "9 weeks since the baby was conceived."

Surely you noticed that your due date didn't point to the wrong guy as dad? Why didn't you ask your doctor all of this? Not that it's a bad thing to know for certain by DNA test, but sometimes a doctor can explain the pregnancy count and ease the woman's misunderstanding.
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Even though my periods are irregular the ultrasound dates on my pregnancy will always be 2 weeks younger? Do you understand what im trying to ask?
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134578 tn?1483549754
If a doctor, nurse, or any medical person looks at your ultrasound and says you're, for example, 8 weeks "pregnant", it is not a figure that counts back to conception but to two weeks before conception. When your actual period came and went does not matter. They are computing from the information the embryo provides, its crown to rump measurement and other developmental markers. Your last period could have been two years earlier, and they would measure from the baby and add two weeks at the front end.
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Thank you for all your information it is greatly appreciated.
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