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Porcelain crowns too large?
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Porcelain crowns too large?

I just had 4 upper front crows placed. They are much thicker (front to back) and stick out past my natural teeth on either side. My dentist says that my teeth were reconstructed to the way they should have been had I never had any decay. BUT my teeth were never this large or thick. I hate to think that I paid this much to look like Bugs B. Any ideas?

DT
Texas
Tags: dentist, Teeth
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I've always had problems with this type of attitude.   All very well the dentist giving you this explanation, but you are the one who has to live with it.  They are often unsympathetic about this type of problem because acknowledging your concerns means having to redo the crowns and pay out of their own pocket.  You should get a second opinion and then go back to the other dentist.   There is no reason why crowns have to be so thick other than the technician's abilities.   With all the strong materials around these days it is easier to make thinner crowns.  Certainly to the point of fitting in with your other teeth.  It also depends on how your tooth has been prepared and that comes down to how skilled your dentist is and how conservative he has been in reducing your teeth.  Some dentists prefer to leave more tooth (as this is considered better for the long term health of your teeth), but this means the technician has little option but to make thicker crowns.  
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Dlt78962,
I have had the same work done (4 upper crowns) and feel the same way. What did you end up doing? They told me it will take a few days to get used too, but i just don't think ill end up happy with them, or dont know if im being too self concious?
I'm thinking about calling the dentist back up next week.
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Avatar_n_tn
I had mine replaced when I wasn't happy.  The dentist who does them never wants to replace and always tells you that it's all in your head or glosses over. Basically if they replace they lose money and as they are a business they need to make money.  

I therefore never let anything be fitted without insisting on trying first with temp cement to ensure they feel right.  If a practice won't let me do this I won't have work done there because it's not worth the hassle and trauma of having something you hate and it also ruins your life if you feel too self consious about your teeth.  

It's very important to be happy with your front teeth, especially when you are paying lots of money for them.  A good dentist should understand the importance of psychological acceptance of cosmetic changes and take into account the fact that patients need the reassurance that they have some control over the process.   They should also understand things like aesthetics, facial symmetry, bite, feel of your teeth, the way the teeth fit into your face, the type of teeth appropriate for your ethnic background (different ethnic groups have differently shaped/sized teeth), etc.   There are dentists who understand all these things and take pride not only in their technical ability to do the job, but also in the satisfaction their efforts bring the patient if they listen to the patient's concerns and take into account the patient's requirements.   There are also dentists who just want to get the job done and ring up the cash register.  It's difficult to tell which is which because they all act very nice until you turn up with a problem after you have paid them.......

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If your dentist is any good he would replace them for no cost to you.  Usually if a dentist explains the situation to the lab they will not charge another fee for the new crowns.  He may have to prep the teeth a little smaller in order to get a smaller crown.  Are the crowns porcelain with metal on the inside or all porcelain.  Considering that they are front teeth it is fairly safe to use all porcelain crowns...they aren't as strong, but the teeth won't have to be prepped as small, since there isn't that extra layer of metal to fit in.  I had this situation happen a few months ago with one of our patients, we let her wear it for a while and decide what she wanted to do.  She decided to remake it, so we cut it off and started over.  I don't think that the lab charged another fee.  We took a new impression with the crown on to show them the difference in the surrounding teeth.
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I'm having a similar issue.  I have a new crown on my lower right molar - the last one in the  back.  My bottom teeth are pretty flat - the dentist says I have  a deep bite.  (Another time the temp cap kept coming off and they said it was because the tooth was so flat - not much to adhere to)  This is my third crown in about a year and a half and fifth all together.  It seems that the new crowns affect the other teeth -  the bite is a little different and I suspect it accelerates the loosening/chipping of the other fillings.
When I told the dentist the cap felt too big, the dentist worked on 'rounding' the upper teeth to make the bottom crown fit.  It didn't seem like it was helping that much.  I am concerned that I will end up needing a crown on the upper molar, too, if the tooth holding it in is ground away, and I don't want to lose any more real tooth.  I asked the dentist to give me time to see if I just needed to get used to the new crown.  Some of my crowns did not feel comfortable right away, so I am hoping I will get used to this.  The dentist wanted to keep working on it, and I think is determined to make this crown fit, anyway, anyhow.  If I can't get used to it, how do I go about getting a new one?
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Avatar_m_tn
It is difficult to express cosncerns to a dentist but a good cosmetic dentist should rectify the problem http://www.cosmeticdentistryguide.co.uk is a great resource if you are looking for advice from cosmetic dentists as they have a panel of experts that you can directly communicate with.
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270696_tn?1243551620
It's usually not that big of a deal to adjust the tooth that is directly above or below a crown.  It doesn't do damage to the tooth.  It takes just the smallest amount to make a bite feel better.  If you can't get used to the crowns you need to just go back and tell him that you aren't comfortable with them.  That you gave them a chance, and tried to get used to them, but they are not what you payed for.
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Avatar_m_tn
Yeah i got one of my crowns in almost 2 years ago which might be abit late, as for the other front crown i got just over a year ago and one is small and grey looking, the other is big really white thick and sticks out infront of the other teeth which is really annoying and makes me self consious of my smile, altho i cannot afford to pay £600 again to replace them should and would i be able to get them done for free again?
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