Dental Health Expert Forum
'Shaking' teeth
About This Forum:

Questions in the Dental Health forum are answered by Dr. Jerome Tsang. Topics covered include bridges, cavities, crowns, and x-rays.

Font Size:
A
A
A
Background:
Blank
Blank
Blank
This expert forum is not accepting new questions. Please post your question in one of our medical support communities.
Blank Blank

'Shaking' teeth

A friend of mine describes his dental problem, as if all his teeth were "shaking", after he has been outside in the cold. He also has quite extensive pain, and he has to "temper" his mouth for app. one hour, before he can eat or drink anything. What can this be? Some kind of a problem with the dental nervs??? He has had the problem for quite a long time, and even though the extensive cleaning (even inside the gums) of his teeth a few weeks ago helped a little, it has not removed the problem. I am quite worried about this. (Just to mention, he is under great emotional and, I assume, physical stress because of his present situation.)

Additonally, I am worried about his gums being pushed away from covering his teeth as they should. Does it help, if he from now on is cautious enough to brush his teeth in the "right" direction; i.e. downward in the upper and upward in the lower jaw? Also, tooth structure at the gum of no 3 and 4 upper tooth on both sides seems to be "worn out" and there is a yellow/brownish area. Is this due to wrong tooth brushing technique? What can/must be done help this problem?

I look worward to your answers!
Related Discussions
Avatar_dr_m_tn
I'm not sure what you mean by "temper" his mouth and teeth were "shaking".  It sounds like your friend has very sensitive teeth due to gingival recession.  This may be due to the periodontal condition of his teeth,  toothbrush abrasion, or a myriad of other reasons.    He should address these concerns with his dentist, there are procedures to reconcile these conditions.
2 Comments
Blank
Avatar_m_tn
sounds like exposed dentin (sensitive tooth structure below the normal level of the gumline and below the level of the enamel) has been worn down due to abrasion, probably from receding gums/ which may in turn be due to either gum disease or improper brushing technique with perhaps the wrong toothbrush. if this is the case, there are a few different types of treatments available. your "friend" needs to see a dentist. it probably won't go away by itself.
Blank
Continue discussion Blank
MedHelp Health Answers
Blank
Weight Tracker
Weight Tracker
Start Tracking Now
RSS Expert Activity
469720_tn?1388149949
Blank
Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm-treatable... Blank
Oct 04 by Lee Kirksey, MDBlank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
The 3 Essentials to Ending Emotiona...
Sep 18 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank
242532_tn?1269553979
Blank
Control Emotional Eating with this ...
Sep 04 by Roger Gould, M.D.Blank