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Teeth and your Heart
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Teeth and your Heart

I heard that cavities if left unchecked and even with normal brushing of the teeth can cause heart problems is this true? If so how long would it take for this to take effect? I have three big cavities in my mouth two of which bleeds a lot during my sleep and days when I don't have time to brush my teeth in the morning for awhile. I have had the two biggest ones(the bleeders) for the last 7 years and the third one about a year now. After a few years with the first two I started to feel an odd pinching feeling in my heart area. I played it off as not getting out much so I worked out more but every now and then I get the feeling. I was told I need two root canals but I don't have any insurance and it would cost me 1000 that I don't have. Should I go get my heart checked?
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Avatar_f_tn
Cavities, and gum disease can cause heart problems when the bacteria breaks looks and gets into your blood stream.  But any time you have any suspicion that your heart may be acting up you should get it checked out.
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Avatar_n_tn
Dear Fellow Dental Sufferer,
The question is why do you have cavities?  What are you doing to stop having cavities?  Although I am sure what Mammo says is correct, what I have previously heard about is how root canals can lead to heart disease.  And I have no doubts about this, having observed how a dental infection in a canine tooth with a root canal caused variations in heart rate and breathing.  Having the tooth pulled solved the infection and the affects on the heart and breathing.

So it is best to avoid having root canals and dental infections if you can.  Better to never lose a single tooth. The question is what value you chose.  Donuts or teeth?  If you chose donuts you can have the root canals and evenutally loss a few teeth.  If you chose teeth you need lots of dark greens, roots, whole grains, animals that flew, ran, swam, or got laid.  No coffee and sugar.  Skip the Seagrams7 and Gin & Tonic.  Forget cake, candy, and cookies.  Do it because you want to eat happily your whole life and not just until you are 50.

The trouble with this formula is it goes against the common grain of modern society.  For if everyone at works goes to the donut shop for lunch, the person who doesn't tends to get left out.  So wanting to organize diet to support health of teeth can have social repercussions.  And then again its not easy to change if you have been raised on Cheerios, FigNeutons, IceCream, and a different layer cake every week.

Meanwhile, you can do natural things to help your teeth.  Crush a calcium tablet and rub the powder around the gumline.  Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body, has a role in every physical process, and relieves pain.  Also take supplement as directed.

Oregano has antibiotic properties.  Bring pint of water to a boil, turn off and drop a tbsp of Mediteranean Oregano leaves in it.  Drink it slowly like tea.

Take a teaspoon of virgin coconut oil and let it roll around in your mouth as long as possible nourishing your tissues and nerves.

Then there is wheat grass juice, rich in chlorophyll which promotes red blood cell production, enables blood stream to carry more oxygen, cleansing and nourishing nerves and cells. Some people claim it restores damaged teeth.  Look it up.

Remember.  Nerves are tough but hair thin.  They can only take so much acidic abuse from either fruit, alcohol, or sweet factory products.  Weekend parties can be a dental blowout.

Choosing teeth over donuts can be a challenge, but one that will make you more alive.
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Avatar_f_tn
I have always eaten anything I wanted, including lots of sugar in my life.  I'm now 60, and still have all my own teeth, and very white ones at that.  Eat what you want, just make sure you always brush, floss, and see your dentist 2 X a year.
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Avatar_n_tn
Its not the same for everyone.  When we are born we each have different mouths with different dental conditions.  There are soft teeth and hard teeth.  Some come into wealthy homes, others not so wealthy, which shows up in nutrition and dental care.  If diet is rich in acid is does not matter how much you brush, floss, gargle, or visit the doc.  

This truth can be understood by visiting Hawaii, and meeting with fishermen who eats lots of fish rich in calcium, magnesium, phosphorus protein, the elements which teeth are made out of.  Great teeth.  Next go meet the pinneapple field workers who lunch on acidic pinneapple every day.  Rotten teeth.  In both of these instances individuals do not brush and floss after every meal, not necessarily because they were not taught or don't want to, but its inconvenient.

There are plenty of root canals out there in teeth that have been brushed every day.  Its up to you whether you want to test the 'eat all the sugar you want, and drink a little whiskey theory', or run with your teeth for greater health protocols.
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Avatar_f_tn
I grew up in extreme poverty, with lack of dental care, and would use salt to brush my teeth.  People can brush their teeth 3-4 times a day, but if they're not doing it correctly, it's not doing much good.  The pineapple people would not have bad teeth if they brushed and flossed, period!  I know of nobody who brushes after every meal or snack, nor have I, but I do brush 2 x a day which anyone can and should do.  Nor am I an advocate for "eating all the sugar you want" this is harmful to more than just your teeth!  Just use common sense, brush thorougly, and floss correctly.
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