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X-ray radiation
I have several concerns about radiation. While there are a lot of sources that say dental X-rays have minimal radiation, etc.  I am still a bit concerned, since I consistently get ill after getting dental x-rays.

I was wondering if there was any cap to radiation exposure built into the dental x-ray machines, or whether it was at the dentist's discretion how much radiation was used. I am basically wondering if it was possible for a dentist to purposely (or accidentally) expose you to dangerous levels of radiation.

Also, I was wondering if there was any radioactive material that could be released from the machine, much like how there is Americium in smoke detectors. Thanks.
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As long as we follow the protocol, there is no known injuries to pateints and x-ray operators.
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While I realize going according to protocol may limit radiation exposure, what I am asking is whether it is POSSIBLE for a dentist to expose you to dangerous levels of radiation of purpose or whether the machines have a hard cap on the amount of radiation exposure.
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Yeah, It make me nervous getting dental x-rays bc they cover your chest with the heavy lead bib and then repeatedly repose your entire face/mouth to the radiation. It freaks me out! I just switched dentists and had to have X-rays done again and they took about 10 of them... it seemed excessive!
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I doubt seriously that a dentist could intentionally expose you to a dose of x-rays that would make you sick.  First of all, the films would come out black from the exposure, making them useless.  There also are limits to the settings on the machines, and they are always set to the normal settings for the average adult or child.  There are some adjustments you can make, but they are minimal.  The machines are also checked on a regular basis by the local radiation regulatory agency.
By the way, if you live in a high altitude area like Denver, CO, you get 3 times the amount of radiation every year that you would receive from a full-series of dental x-rays (16-18 films), and this kind of series is only taken every 3-5 years on average.  The incidence of cancer is actually lower in Denver than it is in many areas of the country.  The lead apron is used to cover the most radio-sensitive areas of the body - the reproductive organs, and blood forming tissues.  The stuctures in the head are not nearly as sensitive as these areas.
Bottom line, dental x-rays are nothing to stress out about, but they also should not be taken unless necessary.  
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My dentist took a full set of x rays about 7 months ago, then I had some work done, he would drill, take an x-ray, drill, take an xray, etc.  over and over about 12 times, then I went back for my 6 month check up last month, and he wanted to take 14 bite and wing x rays, does this seem  a little excessive?
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