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Pain Medication
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Pain Medication

Hi,

I have heart disease with chronic angina and was recently diagnosed with colitis. I'm taking Pentasa for the colitis, plus several heart medications and am feeling well in general. My GI doctor also prescribed Percocet, twice daily for moderate-to-severe abdominal pain.

I've discovered that the pain medication helps with the angina: when I experience "chest pain" now, I only feel pressure.

While I don't want to become dependent on Percocet, I also have to admit that it's nice not to have to live with pain which I've experienced for the past few years.

I know I'm at risk for physical addiction and am being careful by following my doctor's recommendations on dosage, etc. When does the body become addicted, after a period of weeks? What are the warning signs? After the ulcers heal, I'll quit taking the Percocet. What do you recommend in terms of withdrawl (withdrawal) steps?

Thanks,
C
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242532_tn?1269553979
The warning signs are basically when you feel yourself to be psychological dependent, and the pills becomes your "magic" you can't live without, and think about when you can take them again. The physiologic addiction can be tough for some people but not for all,but given your other conditions, I think you should ask your doctor about how he wants to deal with that if it happens.
9 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
Hello,
i was on ALOT of pain meds(loritabs,percocet,vicoden,etc)basically they're all the same. Mine for back pain. I strongly suggest being very careful with using the meds. You can and will build a tolerance for them. Then will need more medication for the problem. They are very addictive and i found myself addicted after about 6 months of daily usage. Then thats when the disaster happens...please be cautious.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi There,

I'm not trying to change the subject, but my question falls under Pain Medication / Mental Health also.

I have prescription pain relievers I take for menstrual cramps (usually naproxin but on really rough days I'll take tylenol 3)

I've found that with these, the pain not only goes away, but also my mood is noticeably elevated, even more so than during the rest of the month when I am not PMSing.

I don't think I suffer from depression, but my usual state is kind of "Miss Know It All"  and a little on the selfish side, which I know is not right, or healthy. When I take one of the above for my cramps, my mood turns to happy go lucky, grateful, and generous.

I don't want to become dependent on anything, but I'm wondering if I could be suffering from some kind of chemical deficiency that the above medications provide. Most of what I've read is that a possible side effect of these drugs is depression, but they have to total opposite effect on me. I become more creative and productive, moreso than in my regular day to day life.

I'm open to natural remedies, I just would really like to know "what it is" that brings such immediate and effective mood elevation, and where can I get it outside of the above medications? Not looking for dependency, just a clearer mind.

Thanks for your time.

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38309_tn?1270893703
I wish you would pay your fee and post your question! It's fascinating. Here's some info that may help:

One of the neurotransmitters playing a major role in addiction is dopamine. Many of the concepts that apply to dopamine apply to other neurotransmitters as well. As a chemical messenger, dopamine is similar to adrenaline. Dopamine affects brain processes that control movement, emotional response, and ability to experience pleasure and pain. More info:  

http://www.utexas.edu/research/asrec/dopamine.html

Your own body produces the molecules of emotions; the best way to access them is through exercise and breathing techniques, both of which have been clinically proven to raise endorphin levels. Music and laughter have similar effects. Think about what makes you feel good and pursue more of it during your period. As tempting as they are, addicting drugs are dangerous pathways to pleasure and energy.

BTW, I was watching the Discovery Health channel the other night which featured a story on the "Half Ton Man." Scientists studying the obese with food addictions found the same brain imaging patterns as those with cocaine addictions. When interviewing one of the super-obese men on the show, he compared himself to an alcoholic who, once admitting his or her alcholism (alcoholism) was never allowed to take a drink again and said, "What am I supposed to do? Quit eating?" I thought, what an excuse! The solution is to surround yourself with the right people and foods: no refined sugar, processed meats, heavy sodium or bleached flour products which stimulate craving.

The same discipline can be used to help cure or avert drug addiction. Surround yourself with techniques that raise your body's own endorphins, plus take yourself out of situations that provide the crutch, i.e., fire the doctor who prescribes Tylenol 3 for menstrual cramps even if you like her or him. Some doctors will not prescribe pain meds unless your in the hospital with a broken leg, etc.

I'm writing this for you as well as myself! LOL!  

Best,
C


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Avatar_n_tn
Sounds to me that you have nothing to be too worried about.  From what I read, you seem to be taking the naproxen or the tylenol 3 for the pain only when it's present - not regularly or for the benefit of feeling "drugged" up.  If this is correct, than you are fine.  What you are worried about is some sort of response that makes you happier or more cheerful when you take these on the days when you have your period.  Well, I'm not a doctor but I have a couple of ideas that could be the cause of your elevated mood.  One, it seems only a natural response to feel good after you stop feeling the pain - so maybe it's just you're happier because you feel better.  Also, it could be endorphins that were released when you were feeling the pain, and now that the pain is diminished, maybe you are getting a good side effect from your own natural chemistry?  Or, it could be that if you didn't have the pain during your periods, you might naturally be in a better mood during that time of month, perhaps due to some sort of hormonal fluctuation?  Not everyone gets really mean during their periods, I'm sure it could just be a normal reaction for you to your period.  Some women actually feel better, even more sexual, during their periods.  This is just as normal too.  And finally, it could just be your response to the drugs.  They are sedatives and will give you a feeling that can be described as elated by some depending on the amount you take.  This is also normal, just as long as you don't take them regularly even when you don't have pain.  Just enjoy the fact that you are happy on those days and don't worry about, is what I'm getting at basically!  :)
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi everyone.  I'm so glad I found this site too.  My husband and I have decided to get pregnant.  Hence, I need to get off all of my meds...right...?  I didn't realize that I'd been taking Loratab5 4 times a day for 6 months.  Two weeks ago, I quit Trileptal (mood stabalizer/anticonvulsant).  One week ago, I quit Ambien and Seroquel (antipsychotic).  Each week, I've got through Mania-depression at rapid cycling.  Then--two days ago, I quit Loratab, cold turkey.  I'm having terrible pain (I have 2 herniated discs in my back L4&L5), my hands and feet are itching terribly, I cannot sleep, my head is cloudy, and I feel sleepy, but never able to sleep....  I'm a mess.

First, How long do these symptoms last?  I know this is just mind-over-matter for me.  I'm very strong willed--I've got a really supportive husband who is helping me get though this.

Second, If I do have a child, we're going to have to have a C-section, meaning, more pain killers.  Now, I'm afraid of them, seeing as I've been on them for 6 months without batting an eyelash.  
I'm already starting to miss the "fuzzy" feeling from them.  The lack of pain--and the energy I had.  My doctor was more comfortable giving them to me, as I'm in the medical field myself.  However, now I resent myself and am afraid to tell him I'm addicted.

Any comments, help, etc. would be fantastic.
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Avatar_n_tn
Hi There and thanks for the couple of replies.

I originally found this site via a search engine and immediately thought it was just another chat/message board. I hadn't realized there is a donation for questions.

So I paid my $5, and my question is here (hope the link works):
<a href="http://www.medhelp.org/perl6/MentalHealth/messages/33225.html">;
http://www.medhelp.org/perl6/MentalHealth/messages/33225.htm
</a>

Sorry for the confusion. My apologies to Carolina03 -- I really wasn't trying to change the conversation. I was just brand new at the time.
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Avatar_n_tn
look iv   got a load to sell subitex am in uk but i did my detox in 4days it was not as hard as i through but the subitex are fuking best eva i have 100s of the 8 mg 1s and 2mg 1s i think u should start day 1 10mg day2  20 and go up to 32mg which is the most they say u should have but am selling them if u want to buy them email me asap
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Avatar_n_tn
When getting off pain meds usually the withdrawal symptoms will last about 2 weeks (at least it did for me).  Increased pain is common as well as runny nose, yawning, and for me I had terrible restless legs.  That all went away after about 2 weeks but it took my body another couple of weeks to 'normalize' if you will, where I could stay focused on things again and feel normal.

By the way, the feeling of elation and excess energy is common with pain medication, especially if you have been using it a while.  At first it knocked me out and I could not do anything but sleep on it, then it started having the exact opposite effect and that is what makes it hard to stay away from because you know you will be in a better mood so you try to talk yourself into needing it for whatever ache or pain you are having.  And your tolerance does build up.  By the time I had my back surgery I had been on so much pain medication that they were totally unable to control my pain safely and I went through utter hell postoperatively.  I never knew what 10 on the scale from 1-10 meant until then, and I have been through childbirth.
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