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What is the point of living?
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What is the point of living?

Hi..
Why should suicide be by default wrong and living the right thing to do?  Isn't there a time when life is no longer meaningful or enjoyable and to continue living is to literally torture yourself? Some people say there will always be hope but isn't that just an assumption which may or may not be true? Isn't there times when there is really little hope of overturning the the current situation? Some people also said that if we commit suicide then people close to us will feel really bad about it and I agree that we should try not to make them feel bad. But now it seems that the only reason to continue struggling is because you don't want people around you to feel bad about it.
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585414_tn?1288944902
Its not wrong as in immoral but its not the right decision because treatment can improve how you feel about life. Depression is treatable. Sometimes a person who hasn't responded to first line anti-depressents will respond to others. Google "Depression Central" for more information and you could speak to a psychiatrist about available options. Don't think so much how you feel now but how you will feel after the depression you experience is treated and at that point things will change and you won't have suicidal ideations and you could speak to a talk therapist about how to improve the other aspects of your life. Recovery is a slow road but its worth every step upwards.
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Avatar_m_tn
I agree there comes a point at which life just isn't worth living. I have been to that point more times than I care to remember.

The way I keep myself from ending my life is to keep telling myself that I haven't tried everything yet. Sure I have tried dozens of medications in the past many years. Some with good and bad results. Many with good results that didn't last.

But I always tell myself "you haven't tried everything yet."

Now when and if I get to a point where I have tried everything and their simply is not one thing left to try (I don't mean just drugs) then I will end my life.

At this point I figure I'm about half way thru trying everything known to God and science.
That should give me at least another 20 years and then probably an additional 10 years for new stuff that comes out after that. So in 30 years I will be an old man anyway and won't really care. They can put me in a nursing home and people can change my diapers for me while I play checkers and throw stuff at people.
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975904_tn?1251825627
living is hard, no one ever said life would be easy. i've lived with depression for more than 15 yrs. my oldest brother committed suicide when i was 10 yrs old, he was 21 and my care taken when the alcoholic parents weren't around.  it destroyed my world and i could NEVER put the ones that love me through that kind of pain.  i take my meds but they don't always work so i keep trying something else, keep chugging along because the good days are worth it.  it's easy to focus on the pain but you have to take control and pull yourself up.  i also think when i'm older and dependent on others than it might be time for me to take control in another way.  that day's not here yet for me nor for you. along with meds, exercise is very important.  you have got to start helping yourself and only you can do this.  as i'm typing this, i realize i am telling myself these same words.
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Avatar_m_tn

Thanks for sharing with me your life experience and view point. I can see that we all experience same problems and all of you are very determined people who persisted for many many years. If anyone is free, do you mind to give your advice on my situation?    

Sometimes I wonder why people are saying as though visiting a specialist doctor is cheap or at least always affordable.

My father passed away when I was very young, my mother having speech problems and my family is not in good term with relatives. My brother is the only one carrying all the burden and he is married and has to take care of his own family and me and my mother.

He told me that I'm draining all his money every month because of medical fees and house expenses and constantly asking me when I'm going to recover. He said I'm such a burden that now he cant buy what he wants like a car or good food.

My mother hasn't being supportive as well. She said that there are people who don't even have food to eat and I'm considered too fortunate and told me to stop using mental illness as a "weapon".

I suffered from very severe social anxiety and depression. I've being secluded for 6 years, lost all friends contact, never work before because if I go out in crowds, I will puke and have serious panic attack.Medication either doesnt help or they made me so dizzy that I couldn't do simple stuff, that makes me more depressive.

I stopped seeing doctors because I'm such a money drainer. Free-of-charge counsellors I must say honestly weren't really helping much and in the end adviced me to visit a specialist again which is very expensive.

Government can't help me because my brother is fully capable of paying the medical fees but to the expense of most of his own enjoyment.

With only high school qualification and living in a country where discrimination of the mentally-illned is widespread, I doubt that anyone would want me as an employee even if one day I'm cured of these problems. I probably will have to work more than 12 hours a day 6 days a week just to survive.

What can I do? Help me with advices if you are free.


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993160_tn?1292102264
There are times I wake up in the morning and start crying because I woke up.  I was hoping that I wouldn't wake up.  I have been feeling that way a lot lately.  I told my mom and sister that if they ever see that I was in an accident or not an accident, don't intervene...let me just go.  My mom, sis, and I all depend on each other financially.  If I am out of the picture, they would be in a very bad situation and vice versa for me.  I have gotten to the point that I don't want to leave the house.  I am scared to.  I have told my friends in May 2009, that I am sorry I can't be their friend anymore because I can't cope with anything.  Today will only be the 6th time I have left my house since December 2008.  I start a temp job next week and I don't know how to cope.  OCD, Depression, Anxiety...yeah, death doesn't sound too bad!
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997315_tn?1252617773
killing yourself is a coward way of dealing with things. life is hard but we have to keep on living no matter what. you want to make people feel bad about you but at the end of the day no matter if what they did or do they'll get it back in return. there's always hopes in life you'll just have to wait and see it for youself.

go and see doctor, they will def help you. remember be strong. your not the only one alone in this world.
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975904_tn?1251825627
wow, i can still so relate to you.  i've found that learning to be alone is o.k.  i constantly worry what people are saying or thinking about me and i know it shouldn't matter but it does.  i have no real friends, i know people but not a one would ever call just to see how i was doing or ask if i wanted to go hang out.  my fortune is i am married (happily married i'm not so sure),  i have 3 kids and a job.  that's all that's "going" for me. i work and go home and do it all over again the next day. i have panic attacks when i have to be around a lot of people, even in church, grocery store or dr's office - anywhere.  i'm always by myself and sometimes it's a real downer.  the web has made such a difference.  an endless source of information and maybe somewhere down the road i'll even make a connection with someone who understands the emptiness inside.  start out with little steps in helping yourself get to a point where you can handle being around others.  remember, most of it is mind over matter.  you have to keep positive and break down your barriers.  i've spent over $10,000 on hospitals, psychiatric & therapy only to learn there is no real "cure".  there's no magic pill that's going to make it all go away.  you have to persevere.  there are several things you can do for yourself.  being here and posting is one of them.  writing about your feelings is very good, keep a diary or a personal blog then go back several weeks or months later and see if your emotions improve.  i even worked the 12 step program - just from a depression stand point and not an addiction.  i even have to keep starting over; not necessarily the 12 steps but other tools i have learned along the way.
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Avatar_m_tn
Thanks for sharing all these, you all are very strong people who went through all these terrible hardship and still are able to keep on going. I hope that all of your problems will get better as well as mine too. Wish you all all the best, good luck.
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1001199_tn?1288139053
If I ever get to the point of truly wanting to commit suicide I'd have the time of my life-- here's why.

Instead of just ending it all I'd take a bunch of huge risks like robbing a bank or stealing a ferrari or just wander the streets free of all responsibility and sleep all night and day. It may be just the boost you need to get yourself back on track and if that all fails then maybe I'd think about ending.
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Avatar_m_tn

Well...maybe I'll try that out but not to that extreme of robbing the bank. Anyway you have a point, maybe all these will get us back to life again. But seldom do people with depression get to have such energy to do extreme "stunts". Well...we'll see.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hi Ken,

The reason humans feel suicide is wrong is mainly because our minds and bodies were built to survive. So there is a huge resistance towards any harm , and self harm. It's called the survival insinct with a little sibling called "fight or flight".

So many of us talk and think about it as if it's an easy way out. It is not by any means. Once you decide you will then you are faced with an awdul dilemma, having to do it, or at least try. So you go through all the possibilities and frankly none of them are good. One of the scariest scenarios is that you try but only succeed in destrpyin a number of bodliy functions but live. I know 2 who did they and they live scared, every day. Much worse off now.

Don't talk about it lighly as one person at the bottom does. There is no way that if you are at the end of a suicidal descent that you would have "the time of your life". You just wouldn't have the interest or the ability. You couldn't do it as that is the opposite of what you would be feeling.

Of course there is always hope. If there wasn't none of us would have been born at all. Think of what our way back relatives went through to get us here. We woulldn't have survived that stuff with our easy life styles would we? We complain because we can't find the right pill. Me included and I'm bitter about it. But it's nothing to what many put up with even today in so many countries. Of course there's always hope.

You say maybe people around you would feel bad if you did it. Let's be honest here mate. They would feel worse than bad. They'd feel responsible, to blame and some would become depressed trying to understand it. Even if you explained it fully and smiled at them.

If you have family that extends dramatically. Your children, if any, would never get over it and they would carry the guilt, worry for life and it would likely filter through to the next generation. It's happened in a number of families I know, including mine. It's a very selfish thing to do actually as you have no idea gow much you will hurt others and who you may hurt.

If that's the only reason you have to live then it's a very good reason. Think about it. If you lived another 40 years at full depression level that's forty years of suffering. For you. Right. Maybe you have 4 people who care enough so it affects them and some of their children and family become affected too. You, by electing to live and face your own suffering will have saved all that misery. Think it through. You see even in that forty years of yours there is no way you will be full on suicidal for the whole time.

I've had D for 48 years and probably 12 of those years have been nightmares. Work the numbers, take responsibility, that alone will change your life and the way you look at things mate. Truly.

Hensley, You have found the way to get through. look to the next option as you know it MIGHT help. Right? One day it will mate. So keep deferring and it will come. I wait too but with more hope than I had not too long ago now.

To Ken again,

Specialist psychiatrist I see and have for 10 years. You know what I pay? For a half hour session, $20 Australian. We have a good health care program, not as good as some but way better than the US where those that need it most get nothing. Right? So the answer there is political. Don't sit back and be quiet while Obama tries to get his reforms through. The rich will shout louder than you but keep talking and telling until there's enough to change it. The President wants it so it ain't too far awayif you persist, the many you's.

By the way, I gave up smoking to pay for the visits. One packet costs nearly $20 here now so I'm way in front. @= years now. That's an incentive. Health or baccy.
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591295_tn?1293848852
I have had seriously bad depression before, and I'm now recovering from the current session for which medication was clearly required. The first antidepressant they put me on was prozac; it caused me to become a zombie. I literally couldn't move for minutes at a time, and it could take me two or three hours to get out of the house and to go for a walk to the shops. I eventually got organised enough to see my doctor and she got me onto effexor which stabilised me - thank the stars.

Anyway, the point of my reminiscing is that I got through the zombie period by holding onto the fact that it is "only clinical depression" (with a prozac downer on top of it, admittedly) and it will recede eventually. Other people will come up with all sorts of reasons why you have depression; most of their ideas will not be helpful for you. In fact, I've found that it is a huge relief to meet a fellow traveller, so to speak, as they are the only ones that understand what it means to have clinical depression - as opposed to feeling a little sad and dejected, for example.

It is far better to accept that you have clinical depression which is a (temporary) brain malfunction to put it naively. That is the predominant reason your thoughts are negative irrespective of how good life really is; that is the major reason for your emotions to be horribly biased to the black well of despair; colour is drained from your normal perception of the world around you due to clinical depression - it is as simple as that.

The bottom line is that your brain is just another bodily organ - and like any other organ, it can run adrift if stressed too much. While we all have some degree of control over our brains, we can't always prevent them from going awry. People get too hung up on thinking it's all in their head, as though that implies they should have total control over it. Of course it is in the head; where else would depression manifest itself? That doesn't mean you should feel guilty about it, as if you are somehow responsible for it.

The great tragedy of clinical depression is that the point at which medical intervention would be of greatest benefit, the depressed person is often beyond caring, they just want it all to stop. They aren't particularly wanting to kill themselves, it is just that in the emotionally and rationally deprived state that is clinical depression, they incorrectly think stopping the bleakness is easiest by suicide - now, rationally, suicide requires a degree of organisation, probably a lot more than would be required to ring up the doctor's clinic, or the ambulance or something.

The essential problem with suicide is that it is permanent, not to put too fine a point on it. Depression, on the other hand, is a temporary state that will eventually come to pass. Which brings me back to fixing onto the thought that "it is only clinical depression, it will recede", and reminding yourself of that when you need to. It is especially useful if you find yourself thinking negatively; for example, thinking that you are a failure, hopeless, etc. Meanwhile, see a psychiatrist or at least a basic doctor and have a chat about clinical options for getting better.


All the best
OtisDaMan
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591295_tn?1293848852
I have had seriously bad depression before, and I'm now recovering from the current session for which medication was clearly required. The first antidepressant they put me on was prozac; it caused me to become a zombie. I literally couldn't move for minutes at a time, and it could take me two or three hours to get out of the house and to go for a walk to the shops. I eventually got organised enough to see my doctor and she got me onto effexor which stabilised me - thank the stars.

Anyway, the point of my reminiscing is that I got through the zombie period by holding onto the fact that it is "only clinical depression" (with a prozac downer on top of it, admittedly) and it will recede eventually. Other people will come up with all sorts of reasons why you have depression; most of their ideas will not be helpful for you. In fact, I've found that it is a huge relief to meet a fellow traveller, so to speak, as they are the only ones that understand what it means to have clinical depression - as opposed to feeling a little sad and dejected, for example.

It is far better to accept that you have clinical depression which is a (temporary) brain malfunction to put it naively. That is the predominant reason your thoughts are negative irrespective of how good life really is; that is the major reason for your emotions to be horribly biased to the black well of despair; colour is drained from your normal perception of the world around you due to clinical depression - it is as simple as that.

The bottom line is that your brain is just another bodily organ - and like any other organ, it can run adrift if stressed too much. While we all have some degree of control over our brains, we can't always prevent them from going awry. People get too hung up on thinking it's all in their head, as though that implies they should have total control over it. Of course it is in the head; where else would depression manifest itself? That doesn't mean you should feel guilty about it, as if you are somehow responsible for it.

The great tragedy of clinical depression is that the point at which medical intervention would be of greatest benefit, the depressed person is often beyond caring, they just want it all to stop. They aren't particularly wanting to kill themselves, it is just that in the emotionally and rationally deprived state that is clinical depression, they incorrectly think stopping the bleakness is easiest by suicide - now, rationally, suicide requires a degree of organisation, probably a lot more than would be required to ring up the doctor's clinic, or the ambulance or something.

The essential problem with suicide is that it is permanent, not to put too fine a point on it. Depression, on the other hand, is a temporary state that will eventually come to pass. Which brings me back to fixing onto the thought that "it is only clinical depression, it will recede", and reminding yourself of that constantly. It is especially useful if you find yourself thinking negatively; for example, thinking that you are a failure, hopeless, etc. Meanwhile, see a psychiatrist or at least a basic doctor and have a chat about clinical options for getting better.

All the best
OtisDaMan
Blank
591295_tn?1293848852
I have had seriously bad depression before, and I'm now recovering from the current session for which medication was clearly required. The first antidepressant they put me on was prozac; it caused me to become a zombie. I literally couldn't move for minutes at a time, and it could take me two or three hours to get out of the house and to go for a walk to the shops. I eventually got organised enough to see my doctor and she got me onto effexor which stabilised me - thank the stars.

Anyway, the point of my reminiscing is that I got through the zombie period by holding onto the fact that it is "only clinical depression" (with a prozac downer on top of it, admittedly) and it will recede eventually. Other people will come up with all sorts of reasons why you have depression; most of their ideas will not be helpful for you. In fact, I've found that it is a huge relief to meet a fellow traveller, so to speak, as they are the only ones that understand what it means to have clinical depression - as opposed to feeling a little sad and dejected, for example.

It is far better to accept that you have clinical depression which is a (temporary) brain malfunction to put it naively. That is the predominant reason your thoughts are negative irrespective of how good life really is; that is the major reason for your emotions to be horribly biased to the black well of despair; colour is drained from your normal perception of the world around you due to clinical depression - it is as simple as that.

The bottom line is that your brain is just another bodily organ - and like any other organ, it can run adrift if stressed too much. While we all have some degree of control over our brains, we can't always prevent them from going awry. People get too hung up on thinking it's all in their head, as though that implies they should have total control over it. Of course it is in the head; where else would depression manifest itself? That doesn't mean you should feel guilty about it, as if you are somehow responsible for it.

The great tragedy of clinical depression is that the point at which medical intervention would be of greatest benefit, the depressed person is often beyond caring, they just want it all to stop. They aren't particularly wanting to kill themselves, it is just that in the emotionally and rationally deprived state that is clinical depression, they incorrectly think stopping the bleakness is easiest by suicide - now, rationally, suicide requires a degree of organisation, probably a lot more than would be required to ring up the doctor's clinic, or the ambulance or something.

The essential problem with suicide is that it is permanent, not to put too fine a point on it. Depression, on the other hand, is a temporary state that will eventually come to pass. Which brings me back to fixing onto the thought that "it is only clinical depression, it will recede", and reminding yourself of that constantly. It is especially useful if you find yourself thinking negatively; for example, thinking that you are a failure, hopeless, etc. Meanwhile, see a psychiatrist or at least a basic doctor and have a chat about clinical options for getting better.

All the best
OtisDaMan
Blank
591295_tn?1293848852
I have had seriously bad depression before, and I'm now recovering from the current session for which medication was clearly required. The first antidepressant they put me on was prozac; it caused me to become a zombie. I literally couldn't move for minutes at a time, and it could take me two or three hours to get out of the house and to go for a walk to the shops. I eventually got organised enough to see my doctor and she got me onto effexor which stabilised me - thank the stars.

Anyway, the point of my reminiscing is that I got through the zombie period by holding onto the fact that it is "only clinical depression" (with a prozac downer on top of it, admittedly) and it will recede eventually. Other people will come up with all sorts of reasons why you have depression; most of their ideas will not be helpful for you. In fact, I've found that it is a huge relief to meet a fellow traveller, so to speak, as they are the only ones that understand what it means to have clinical depression - as opposed to feeling a little sad and dejected, for example.

It is far better to accept that you have clinical depression which is a (temporary) brain malfunction to put it naively. That is the predominant reason your thoughts are negative irrespective of how good life really is; that is the major reason for your emotions to be horribly biased to the black well of despair; colour is drained from your normal perception of the world around you due to clinical depression - it is as simple as that.

The bottom line is that your brain is just another bodily organ - and like any other organ, it can run adrift if stressed too much. While we all have some degree of control over our brains, we can't always prevent them from going awry. People get too hung up on thinking it's all in their head, as though that implies they should have total control over it. Of course it is in the head; where else would depression manifest itself? That doesn't mean you should feel guilty about it, as if you are somehow responsible for it.

The great tragedy of clinical depression is that the point at which medical intervention would be of greatest benefit, the depressed person is often beyond caring, they just want it all to stop. They aren't particularly wanting to kill themselves, it is just that in the emotionally and rationally deprived state that is clinical depression, they incorrectly think stopping the bleakness is easiest by suicide - now, rationally, suicide requires a degree of organisation, probably a lot more than would be required to ring up the doctor's clinic, or the ambulance or something.

The essential problem with suicide is that it is permanent, not to put too fine a point on it. Depression, on the other hand, is a temporary state that will eventually come to pass. Which brings me back to fixing onto the thought that "it is only clinical depression, it will recede", and reminding yourself of that constantly. It is especially useful if you find yourself thinking negatively; for example, thinking that you are a failure, hopeless, etc. Meanwhile, see a psychiatrist or at least a basic doctor and have a chat about clinical options for getting better.

All the best
OtisDaMan
Blank
591295_tn?1293848852
I have had seriously bad depression before, and I'm now recovering from the current session for which medication was clearly required. The first antidepressant they put me on was prozac; it caused me to become a zombie. I literally couldn't move for minutes at a time, and it could take me two or three hours to get out of the house and to go for a walk to the shops. I eventually got organised enough to see my doctor and she got me onto effexor which stabilised me - thank the stars.

Anyway, the point of my reminiscing is that I got through the zombie period by holding onto the fact that it is "only clinical depression" (with a prozac downer on top of it, admittedly) and it will recede eventually. Other people will come up with all sorts of reasons why you have depression; most of their ideas will not be helpful for you. In fact, I've found that it is a huge relief to meet a fellow traveller, so to speak, as they are the only ones that understand what it means to have clinical depression - as opposed to feeling a little sad and dejected, for example.

It is far better to accept that you have clinical depression which is a (temporary) brain malfunction to put it naively. That is the predominant reason your thoughts are negative irrespective of how good life really is; that is the major reason for your emotions to be horribly biased to the black well of despair; colour is drained from your normal perception of the world around you due to clinical depression - it is as simple as that.

The bottom line is that your brain is just another bodily organ - and like any other organ, it can run adrift if stressed too much. While we all have some degree of control over our brains, we can't always prevent them from going awry. People get too hung up on thinking it's all in their head, as though that implies they should have total control over it. Of course it is in the head; where else would depression manifest itself? That doesn't mean you should feel guilty about it, as if you are somehow responsible for it.

The great tragedy of clinical depression is that the point at which medical intervention would be of greatest benefit, the depressed person is often beyond caring, they just want it all to stop. They aren't particularly wanting to kill themselves, it is just that in the emotionally and rationally deprived state that is clinical depression, they incorrectly think stopping the bleakness is easiest by suicide - now, rationally, suicide requires a degree of organisation, probably a lot more than would be required to ring up the doctor's clinic, or the ambulance or something.

The essential problem with suicide is that it is permanent, not to put too fine a point on it. Depression, on the other hand, is a temporary state that will eventually come to pass. Which brings me back to fixing onto the thought that "it is only clinical depression, it will recede", and reminding yourself of that constantly. It is especially useful if you find yourself thinking negatively; for example, thinking that you are a failure, hopeless, etc. Meanwhile, see a psychiatrist or at least a basic doctor and have a chat about clinical options for getting better.

All the best
OtisDaMan
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Avatar_m_tn

Hi whodunnit,

ya i agree its really scary if you wake up from failed suicide attempt and find yourself severely handicapped and no longer able to function properly. I think I mostly agree with you but I'm kind of confused because when I tell my mom about it, she said if I want to die so badly then just go die I don't care about it anymore. Well... what to do...I guess not everyone will care for you as expected but I think others will like what you said still be greatly affected even if they never seems to show much concern when you are facing these problems. Anyway helpful advice you got, thanks :)


Hi OtisDaMan,

That must really be a terrible experience and I can really relate to you. Sometime these medication really can have serious side effect like making you so dizzy that you cant function properly and some others which you dont consciously feel a thing. Seriously I too hope that like what you said " clincal depression will recede" by itself or at least under professional help. I guess right now it is more advantageous to believe whether true or false that depression will eventually disappear. Without this believe there appears little hope. Anyway thanks for sharing.
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1001199_tn?1288139053
I've had severe depression all my life. Since I never cared abhout what happened to me I took great risks. Some of them had very bad results, and some had amazing rewards. To this day, I've incorporated this type of risk-taking behaior in my professional life and I've climbed the corporate ladder faster than anyone in my companies history. Furthuremore I've started an entirely new department that is the hottest and fastest growing area of the company.

I'd never have taken such great risks if I'd have been too conservative or not depressed. Which also helped me have a view of constant growth and evolving with the company because I never feel as though I'm doing enough or that the company is good enough. That way I'm constantly trying to improve. If I felt happy all the time I wouldn't have the impetus to change and progress.

Although it can have negative results, (obviously my bank robbery comment was in jest and don't condone breaking the law), taking risks because I'm depressed has been extremely rewarding for me.


I say apply for a job that you think you could never get. Talk to the really amazingly hot girl at the bar (or wherever). Send a few articles to a magazine. Who knows, maybe you'll get the job or the girl or your article could be published. Point is- if you're going to end it all anyway, you might as well try.

This is how I've used depression to my advantage and I'll never turn back.
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Avatar_m_tn
Hey Adam, much sympathy re your mother's attitude. Maybe life has just worn her down and maybe she suffers the same. Do you think she does?

Either way mate it's your life, nobody else's and it is your decisionin the end. I just know how awfully hard it is and what can result for not only us. Hang in there and things will change. Depression is temporary, ragrdless of how long temporary is. The changes in mood for  a start show you that don't they?

Best of luck for your future.

To Otis,

Why are you talking about being too conservative? Who raised that, other than yourself? If you do see great advantage in depressive thinking then I feel sorryt for you as the rest of society knows it is destructuve and self damaging. Why don't you?

Frankly mate I have little idea what you are talking about. Firstly there is no depression type "clinical depression". The term simply means a depression being treated by a clinician, a doctor, as opposed to an untreated case. Where you got this idea I do know, so many use the term without asking what it means and people think it is a type of depression. It is not. It is just "depression".

As to your wonderful life of excellent risk taking with all those great results, that is basically bi polar behaviour mate. Behaviour with no regard to the consequences. Untreated bi polar is my guess. Not something I'd recommend to anyone as a solution at any stage of their lives, be it at the end or anywhere.

Enjoy any good results while they are there Otis..
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591295_tn?1293848852
Hi whodunnit,

Just to clarify: it was Adam - in his post to you - that talked about being conservative, taking risks, rising through the corporate ranks, etc. I didn't mention any of those things.

Secondly, I am fairly careful to use appropriate terms when discussing medical issues. The term "clinical depression" is widely accepted and used by experts in mental illness. For example, Berkeley Universal Health Service has it front and centre in their web pages on depression, at url:
  www.uhs.berkeley.edu/lookforthesigns/clinicaldepression.shtml

Then there is the organisation in Australia called "BeyondBlue". Have a gander at:
  www.beyondblue.org.au/index.aspx?link_id=89.578

And another organisation which concentrates on research and treatment of depression, is "The Black Dog Institute". They too speak of clinical depression (in the second bullet point):
www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/public/depression/causesofdepression/genetics.cfm

We are here to help each other.

Regards,
OtisDaMan
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Avatar_n_tn
What if your depression doesnt ever go away and is unbearable and leaves you totally alone feeling worthless
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