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Itching all over, no rash, for weeks now
Hello,

I've been itching all over like crazy for weeks now, and I have no rash whatsoever. The itch started at my upper back, then spread to my lower back, butt crack, belly, breast, thighs and scalp... Sometimes my entire back will itch, and sometimes I have needle sensations at very random places. But the area seems to be expanding.

It all started when I was on a tropical vacation. I first blamed it on the bug bites, but the itch stayed after the bites were long gone. Then I thought it could be the suntan / sun burn, but I've been back and not exposed to the sun anymore and itching more than back then.

I thought of allergies (because I already have several - dust, cats etc.) and took benadryl, it didn't work either. Tried Gold Bond topically and that seems to work a little.

I suspected fungus (as I spent the whole day in a damp bathing suit) and applied anti-fungal lotion to my butt crack and it went away. (coincidence??)

So I thought the whole issue might be fungus and learned about Candidiasis. I happened to have quite a few candidiasis symptoms and was convinced that was the issue. I cut out on sugar, took probiotic supplements (threelac) and grapefruit seed extract. And I'm still itching...

I also read about much scarier scenarios that could be associated with the itching, such as cancer, kidney disease, liver disease, thyroid disease, etc. But I have none of those symptoms (thank God!) but the itching.

I called a doctor for an appointment, but the earliest availability was in a week. So it seems like this whole week I'll continue itching like a maniac and worrying about the possibilities.

Any ideas on what I might have going on? Thanks a lot...

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563773 tn?1374250139
Hello,
Itchy skin that isn't accompanied by other obvious skin changes, such as a rash, is most often caused by dry skin (xerosis). Dry skin usually results from environmental factors that you can wholly or partially control. These include hot or cold weather with low humidity levels, long-term use of air conditioning or central heating, and washing or bathing too much.

Other conditions cause itchy skin as well. Skin conditions like psoriasis, dermatitis, lice, scabies and hives, internal diseases like liver and kidney disorders, diabetes, iron deficiency anemia, irritation and allergic reactions to chemicals, wool, soaps, cosmetics and certain foods  can cause itchy skin.

You can apply an anti-itch cream or lotion to the affected area. Oral antihistamine, such as Benadryl can also be used. You should take a comfortably cool bath and wear smooth-textured cotton clothing. Covering the affected area with bandages and dressings can help protect the skin and prevent scratching. You should choose mild soaps without dyes or perfumes and use a mild, unscented laundry detergent when washing clothes, towels and bedding.

Please take a second opinion from a dermatologist if the symptoms persist. I sincerely hope that helps. Take care and please do keep me posted on how you are doing.

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Thanks Doctor, for confirming all the possibilities that may have caused the persistent itching. But what would you say based on the specifics that I posted above, rather than a generic explanation?

Thank you!
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563773 tn?1374250139
Hello,
It is very difficult to pinpoint a diagnosis without examination and itchy skin without any visible rash can be due to any of the causes mentioned above. If you are having pin ***** sensations then a neurological component also needs to be ruled out as parasthesia can often cause such pin ***** or burning sensations.

I hope it helps. Take care and regards.
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