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Itchy rash on arms, legs, neck, private area
I have had a problem with itching in my private area on my testicles, scrotum, the area between my scrotum and my butt for about a year.  It would come back and go away, however, for the past three months I have been itching so bad that I cannot sleep.  I have itched my butt crack and taint raw to where it is bleeding and pusing.  I have had to change my underwear multiple times a day to no avail.  Now the inner thigh, butt cheeks, my arms especially around my armpits, and my neck around my shirt line are all itching like my private area.  I have tried prendisone for 10 days that originally cleared up everything except my private area, but it all has returned.  I was put on an antibiotic, but my butt crack still seeps.  I have tried numerous docotrs but they act like the do not care.  I have not slept for more than two hours a night for over a month because as soon as I fall as sleep I wake up again.  I tried to use Benedryl, Zyrtec, and Zantac all prescribed by doctors, but nothing has worked.  I am becoming depressed because all I do everyday it itch my crotch.  I am beyond desperate and have no idea what to do, I just know that I cannot keep living like this.  
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563773 tn?1374250139
Hello,

Without examination,confirmation of a diagnosis is tough but it sounds like tinea cruris to me.It is a fungal infection which causes intense itching.

Wash the areas daily and then dry thoroughly by pat drying,not rubbing. A hairdryer is useful if you have hairy groins and genitalia.The damp skin is an ideal site for fungi to multiply.Also wear cotton underwears and change them twice a day and do not share other people’s towels.Application of local antifungal cream(terbinafine, clotrimazole, econazole, ketoconazole, miconazole) and oral antifungal drugs are the mainstay of treatment.

If the symptoms persist then pls consult a dermatologist and get other possibilities ruled out.These are xerotic eczema,senile pruritis,atopic dermatitis,contact dermatitis,parasitic infestations,diabetes and liver or kidney pathologies.

Hope it helps .Take care and pls do keep us posted in case you have any additional queries.Kind regards.
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Dermatitis Herpetiformis

DH is one of the itchiest rashes possible. Common locations of the rash include:

elbows knees lower back hairline back of the neck shoulders buttocks and scalp

The rash is usually the same size and shape on both sides of the body and often comes and goes.

Before a full outbreak of the rash, you may feel the skin in a rash-prone area burn or itch. Bumps that look like pimples filled with clear liquid start to form. These are quickly scratched off. The bumps heal within a few days and leave a purple mark that lasts for weeks. But new bumps continue to form as old ones heal. This process can continue for years, or it can go into remission and then return.



The most effective treatment that’s free of side effects is strict adherence to a gluten free diet This means you should completely avoid food, drink, or medicines containing the following:

wheat rye barley and Oats.

What Is Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

An itchy, blistering, burning skin rash, dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) is a difficult condition to live with. The rash and itching occur on the elbows, knees, scalp, back, and buttocks. This rash likely indicates gluten intolerance, which may be related to a more serious underlying condition known as celiac disease. DH is sometimes called Duhring’s disease or gluten rash. People who have this condition need to maintain a strict gluten-free diet.
What Causes Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

From the sound of the name, many people think this rash is caused by some form of the herpes virus. This isn’t the case, as it has nothing to do with herpes. Dermatitis herpetiformis occurs in people with celiac disease. Celiac disease (also called celiac sprue, gluten intolerance, or gluten-sensitive enteropathy) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by intolerance to gluten. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley. It’s also sometimes found in oats that have been processed in plants that handle other grains.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), 15 to 25 percent of people with celiac disease have DH. Celiac disease can also cause intense abdominal pain, constipation, nausea, and vomiting. People with DH typically don’t have any of the intestinal symptoms. However, even if they don’t experience any intestinal symptoms, 80 percent or more of people with DH still have intestinal damage, especially if they eat a diet that’s high in gluten, according to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA).

The intestinal damage and rash are due to the reaction of gluten proteins with a special kind of antibody called immunoglobulin A (IgA). Your body makes IgA antibodies to attack gluten proteins. When IgA antibodies attack gluten, they damage the parts of the intestines that allow you to absorb vitamins and nutrients. This sensitivity to gluten usually runs in families.

The structures formed when IgA attaches to gluten then enter the bloodstream. They begin to clog small blood vessels, especially those in the skin. White blood cells are attracted to these clogs. The white blood cells release a chemical called “complement” that causes an itchy, blistery rash.
Who Is at Risk for Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

Celiac disease can affect anyone, but it tends to be more common in people who have another family member with celiac disease or DH.

Although more women than men are diagnosed with celiac disease, men are more likely to develop DH than women, according to the NIH. The rash usually begins in your 20s or 30s, though it can start in childhood. The condition more commonly occurs in people of European descent. It less commonly affects people of African or Asian descents.

What Are the Symptoms of Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

DH is one of the itchiest rashes possible. Common locations of the rash include:

elbowskneeslower backhairlineback of the neckshouldersbuttocksscalp

The rash is usually the same size and shape on both sides of the body and often comes and goes.

Before a full outbreak of the rash, you may feel the skin in a rash-prone area burn or itch. Bumps that look like pimples filled with clear liquid start to form. These are quickly scratched off. The bumps heal within a few days and leave a purple mark that lasts for weeks. But new bumps continue to form as old ones heal. This process can continue for years, or it can go into remission and then return.

While these symptoms are commonly associated with dermatitis herpetiformis, they can also be caused by other skin conditions such as atopic dermatitis, irritant or allergic contact dermatitis, psoriasis, pemphigoid, or scabies.

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DIAGNOSIS

How Is Dermatitis Herpetiformis Diagnosed?

DH is best diagnosed with a skin biopsy. A doctor takes a small sample of skin and examines it under a microscope. Sometimes, a direct immunofluorescence test is done, in which the skin around the rash is stained with a dye that will show the presence of IgA antibody deposits. The skin biopsy can also help determine if the symptoms are caused by another skin condition.

Blood tests to check for these antibodies in the blood may also be done. An intestinal biopsy may be performed to confirm the presence of damage due to celiac disease.

If the diagnosis is uncertain, or another diagnosis is possible, other tests may be performed. Patch testing is the best way to diagnose allergic contact dermatitis, which is a common cause of symptoms similar to dermatitis herpetiformis.

TREATMENTS

What Treatments Are Available for Dermatitis Herpetiformis?

DH can be treated with an antibiotic called dapsone. Dapsone is a powerful medicine with serious side effects. The dose must be increased slowly over several months before it’s fully effective.

Most people see relief from taking dapsone, but side effects may include:

liver problemssensitivity to sunlightanemiamuscle weaknessperipheral neuropathy

Dapsone may also have negative interactions with other medications, such as aminobenzoate potassium, clofazimine, or trimethoprim.

Other drugs that may be used include tetracycline, sulfapyridine, and some immunosuppressive drugs. These are less effective than dapsone.

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