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Lump Between Butt Cheeks
I have a lump similar to that in the picture I've attached. What mine looks like is the area below that big hole and instead of being above the crack, it starts right about at the top and goes an inch or so down.

I'm not sure if it's a cyst because I don't have that awful looking hole which is in the picture. This is also not the first time I've had this. It's very uncomfortable to sit on and hurts if I try to look at it. It even hurts if I bend in such a way that it gets stretched. It's not oozing now but it has in the past. I've had them on-and-off for three years or so and it just came back last month.

I've seen a doctor for it, but oddly, he didn't look at it at all. Just felt through my boxers and diagnosed sonic therapy which did nothing. I'm considering seeing a doctor again, who I'd force to look at it, but I want to know if this is something that I can take care of on my own.
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In case the uploaded picture doesn't make it:
http://www.pennhealth.com/ency/images/ency/fullsize/9746.jpg
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Hi,
This could be an eczema, a form of dermatitis, or inflammation of the upper layers of the skin. The term eczema is broadly applied to a range of persistent skin conditions. These include dryness and recurring skin rashes which are characterized by one or more of these symptoms: redness, skin edema (swelling), itching and dryness, crusting, flaking, blistering, cracking, oozing, or bleeding.

Atopic eczema (atopic dermatitis) is believed to have a hereditary component, and often runs in families whose members also have hay fever and asthma. Itchy rash is particularly noticeable on face and scalp, neck, inside of elbows, behind knees, and buttocks.

Dermatitis is often treated by glucocorticoid (a corticosteroid steroid) ointments, creams or lotions. They do not cure eczema, but are highly effective in controlling or suppressing symptoms in most cases.
For mild-moderate eczema a weak steroid may be used (e.g. hydrocortisone or desonide), whilst more severe cases require a higher-potency steroid (e.g. clobetasol propionate, fluocinonide). Medium-potency corticosteroids such as clobetasone butyrate (Eumovate), Betamethasone Valerate (Betnovate) or triamcinolone are also available. Generally medical practitioners will prescribe the less potent ones first before trying the more potent ones.

There is no known cure for eczema, there are periods of remission and flare-ups which have to be treated as they occur.
ref:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eczema
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