Avatar universal
Moles
Hi,
Im a 14 year old male, and I had two moles on my back. I was going to get them removed, but my appointment fell through and my parents failed to make another one. I noticed at the beginning of last school year, I got a white circle around each of the moles on my back. Now it is August and the moles are completely gone. The white circles are still there and now there is just a small red dot in the middle of the circle, Im assuming thats maybe the mole now.
Should I be concerned?

Thanks
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Avatar universal
Hi,

Moles are flat or elevated, flesh coloured to dark-brown markings located randomly over the entire skin surface.Moles are a clump of cells with different pigment (colour) than the surrounding skin. The surface of moles varies from smooth to pebbly and may contain heavy dark hairs or no hair growth.

The number and type of moles that a person has is largely determined by family history.  Moles are occasionally present at birth and usually start appearing between 1 to 4 years of age, increasing in number into adulthood. Moles may be flat or raised and may contain a few coarse hairs.

The colour of moles varies from flesh-coloured to dark. Moles do not indicate any type of disease or illness and can be removed by a number of surgical techniques if desired.
They can be removed by Excision (cutting) with stitches) or Excision with cauterization (a tool is used to burn away the mole).

Although laser has been tried for moles, it is not usually the method of choice for most deep moles because the laser light doesn't penetrate deeply enough.

It would be advisable to consult a skin specialist for the symptoms and a proper clinical examination.

Let us know if you need any other information and post us on how you are doing.

Regards.

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