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Skin cancer?? Misdianosed with ringworm!
Can skin cancer resemble ringworm?? Ive had a spot on my arm for 5 months everyone knows ringworm itches and spreads. This spot doesnt itch or bother me its just the appearance i hate. The middle is sunk a little and the ring is raised and perfect. I had another spot below that looked the same had it for 8 months the circle is still there a little and it left a brown colored pigment there! What could it be? Skin condition or cancer?
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209987 tn?1451939065
Please see a dermatologist ASAP!
My husband had a "spot" that the doctor told him was possibly ringworm or psoriasis....gave him cortisone creams...it spread like wildfire very quickly.
He had felt no pain previous to that...then the pain began. He went back and the doctor told him again it was psoriasis.
I had just lost a bunch of hair and was sent to see a dermatologist. I dragged hubby in with me and showed her the "spot" which now ( after a few months of using the creams ) was covering his entire lower abdomen.
She took one look, told me to leave the room, called another doctor in, and the following week he was in having surgery to remove the cancer.

I am NOT saying that YOU have cancer...I am saying that my husband started off with a spot like that, was misdiagnosed, and he suffered greatly for it. Your's sounds like it "may" have started off as ring worm and then left a scar.  Hard to say...but I really recommend seeing someone about it...just in case.
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I have had so many skin cancers, that I've stopped counting.  I've also been through having them all removed, and am "clear" for now.

So, here are some things I've experienced with basal cell carcinoma -- usually somewhat itchy, doesn't heal, may develop a translucent covering, but that covering is extremely easy to break open or accidentally get torn off.  It can get "blistery", and yes, it can get "blistery" just around the edges.  It grows very slowly -- and it grows underneath the skin and spreads out like tentacles.

If you have a "sore" that is itchy, easily breaks open and/or bleeds a little, and is a bit crusty, or "pearlized" color, I'd get to the doctor as soon as you can.  While you're not going to die from this anytime soon, you want to have it removed as soon as possible, because the more is spreads, the bigger the procedure to get it all out, and the bigger the scar.  Remember, itchy, won't heal, pearlized color.

Second type I've had was Squamous Cell Carcinoma.  Again, started off like a sore that just wouldn't heal.  Itchy.  might produce some fluid when I'd accidentally scratch it, and that would dry over and around the spot.  Grew faster than basal cell, and got bigger than my basal cell carcinoma, on the skin's surface, instead of underneath.  Remember, itchy, won't heal, grows bigger at skin level (not just under skin).

In other words, if you have a "sore" that has been around for a while, it itches, it fails to heal up, and the "pearlized scab" is easily knocked off, I'd get to the doctor.  Make your doctor do a biopsy!  For over a year, they said my first basal cell, was a irritated sebaceous gland.  They gave the thing a year to grow, which caused me to have to have a more complicated procedure to have it removed. Only the biopsy was definitive.  No creams or pills are going to stop skin cancer, trust me.  If the biopsy comes back as basal cell or squamous cell carcinoma, don't panic! Either your regular doctor will take care of it (if they feel comfortable with it), or they will give you a referral to a specialist to take care of it.  DO NOT LET THEM FREEZE IT OFF!  That really, really hurts, blows up into a giant blister within a day, takes an extraordinary amount of time to heal, and leaves a large, circular scar.  Plus, they won't know it they got all of it!  The best way to have it removed is to let them cut it out.  They will make a small incision into the skin, and then carefully cut away the cancer.  They will go very slowly, and very carefully.  They may have to cauterize as they go, because some areas of the body bleed more than others, and cauterization does stink (burning flesh), but it must be done to help you.  They will stitch you back up (usually 1 or 2 stitches), and send you home.  Next, they send the cut out pieces to the lab to make sure that they have gotten all of the cancer by checking or "margins."  Margins are where the cancer stops and the health skin begins.  If they find all the margins, you're good to go.  If not, you may have to go back in and have a bit more removed.  No, it's not fun, but it's not as bad as it sounds.  It's done in office, and they use a local anesthetic.
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