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Tinea Versicolor
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Tinea Versicolor

Hello.

This past summer I was very tan from alot of sun exposure.
However, towards the end of the summer I noticed a rather large
white "patch" in the middle of my chest.  It looked very strange because the rest of my body was tan except for this white patch.  I have since lost my tan because I have not had much sun exposure during the fall and winter months.  However, the whiteness still remains.  There are many white
blothces in the middle of my chest.  Often, when my body temp rises, especially when I sweat due to working, these white blotches turn into red blothces about 24-48 hours after profuse sweating.  My dermatologist just diagnosed the white blotches as tinea versicolor and prescribed me shampoos and a cream (not sure of the exact names).  He also stated that the white blotches turning red 24-48 hours after a lot of sweating is completely normal for tinea versicolor.  It is quite embarrasing having these red blotches on my chest.  After a few days, the redness does goes away, but the white blotches remain.  I am concerned, and I would appreciate your opinion that it is normal for these white blotchs to turn red after increased body temp due to sweating.  Thank you very much.
Related Discussions
242489_tn?1210500813
I agree with your dermatologist--the lack of pigment lets you see the blood vessels more clearly when they open up, as they do after exercise, for instance.  Fortunately, the pigment change is temporary in tinea versicolor.  The treatment will kill the fungus, and then it's just a matter of time (generally a few months) for the color to return.  If you get more white spots in the future, which is likely at some point, it's best to treat them right away, so they won't hang around.

Best.

Dr. Rockoff
6 Comments
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Avatar_n_tn
So these red blotches that cover the white blotches
on my chest are actually blood vessels?  And does it sound normal that the red blotches stay for 4-5 days and then fade
back into white blotches?  

Thank you.
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242489_tn?1210500813
I'm afraid I can't add to what I said.  Since you already saw a doctor in person, you should ask him.  I can't think of anything serious or permanent that you could be describing.

Dr. Rockoff
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Avatar_n_tn
Ihave all these white spot over my face for two years now, what could it be. The dermatologist said they are not a fungus
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Avatar_n_tn
Is this related to the "Seke Seke" that is common in Polynesia?
It's white spots that grow if left untreated, when treated with the liquid sold in pharmacies here, it leaves a dry skin which rubs off. the natural skin colour returns after a while.
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Avatar_n_tn
Honestly I have seen pictures of this "Tinea Versicolor" thing and I dont think I have it BUT I do get funky white spots. I look like I have polka dots after i`m done tanning. Its only happened the past three times I have been tanning. At first I thought It was because I mixed my tanning oil with my tanning accelerater but the next time I went tanning I didnt mix them and still got the spots. They look horrible and its never happened before. Its on my legs my arms and my stomache, Mostly on my chest. WHAT COULD THIS BE!?!?
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