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Weird blister - won't go away
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Weird blister - won't go away

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Hi. My husband's developed a weird blister on the inside of his thigh. It looks like a blister, filled with water, but when we dropped to pop it, it wouldn't. It leaks a bit, but remains the same and gets bigger. There is some pus inside it. We don't have insurance, so can't afford to see the doctor. The big blister won't go away, already for over a week and a half. We've dtried Compound W, Neosporin, washing with Hibiclens, Gold Band anti-itch (it itches). My husband said that the blister seems to be afraid of the sun and salt water from the ocean, but obviously we can't go to the ocean all day long every day. Furthermore, when at work, my husband uses an antibiotic bandage to cover it, otherwise he can't move so comfortably, however that seems to make it worst. We have no idea what to do, it does itch and extremely uncomfortable.

Any and all suggestions are more than appreciated. I have pictures of it, if you need to see.

IIn the pictures; please ignore the gree, it's just an alcohol type solution it puts on it, which happens to be green. Not really helping though...
It looks like a huge blister.

Please help.
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Hi,

Hi,

It would be best to consult a skin specialist at the earliest. This could be an insect bite.

There are several causes of blisters.

'Blisters are usually caused by injury to the skin from heat or from friction, which create a tear between the epidermis—the upper layer of the skin—and the layers beneath.

Short periods of intense rubbing can cause a blister, but any rubbing of the skin at all can cause a blister if it is continued for long enough. Blisters form more easily on moist skin than on dry or soaked skin, and are more common in warm conditions.

Sometimes, the skin can blister when it comes into contact with a cosmetic, detergent, solvent or other chemical; this is known as contact dermatitis. Blisters can also develop as a result of an allergic reaction to an insect bite or sting.

There are also a number of medical conditions that cause blisters. The most common are chickenpox, herpes, impetigo, and a form of eczema called dyshidrosis. '

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blister

It would be best to consult a doctor if it does not resolve on its own in a few days.

Let us know if you need any other information.

Regards.
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