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horrible razor burn on my legs, how do I prevent it?
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horrible razor burn on my legs, how do I prevent it?

I get horrible razor burn every time I shave my legs.  I usually shave with an electric razor to prevent this, but every so often I try again with the blade to see if I can figure out a way to make it work--so far, nothing has.  I do not use a blade often, and the times are far between to give my skin a chance to heal.  I've tried hair removal creams Veet and Nair with the same results.

I always let my legs soak for a while to open the pores and soften the hair, and I always use a shaving creme or gel instead of soap.  I let the creme set for a little while before I begin shaving, just as I was advised to do.  Afterwards, I moisturize with AmLactin lotion, which so far has done the best for my razorburn but still hasn't solved it.  

My legs will usually be fine for a little while, but when the hair starts to grow back, my skin begins to itch.  The itch is terrible, it's woken me from a sound sleep.  I do my best not to scratch, I usually treat with more lotion or cold water, but this doesn't always help.  Usually, even if I don't scratch, I'll start to get red burn bumps by the next day.  The itching and burning will continue for up to a week (!!) and the redness sometimes two.  

I don't know what else I can do to solve this.  I can't afford lazer hair removal, and I've heard that hair softening lotions don't really work.  What should I do?
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Avatar_f_tn
Hi,

It would be best to use good quality disposable razors in your case.

Also use aloe vera gel at the sites where you have shaved. The aloe vera allows for protection from the environment and has analgesic qualities that reduce swelling, soothe the irritation, and form a barrier which protects the skin from infection and promotes healing.

Cortisone cream will also help with the redness and discomfort .

Calamine lotion will also help with the local discomfort.

The rest of the precautions that you are taking are good and should be continued - getting the area wet before shaving, applying creme or gel for some time prior to shaving and preferably taking a bath just before shaving.

If the symptoms still persist, consult a dermatologist.

Let us know if you need any further information.

Regards.

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